Articles from October 2015

Critical Language Scholarship Workshop to be held Nov. 4

Please join us for an informal essay workshop on Wednesday, November 4, from 5-6:30 p.m. in 1117 University Capitol Centre. The workshop is open to any student interested in applying for the Critical Language Scholarship. Associate Director of International Fellowships Karen Wachsmuth will guide provide sample essays and give students who would like to share their current drafts some constructive feedback.

2015 Global Health Studies Conference "Contagion: causes, costs, and containment" to be held Nov. 6 - 8

The 2015 Global Health Conference, "Contagion: causes, costs, containment," will be held from Nov. 6-8, at the University of Iowa. Registration tables open at 3:00 p.m. on the 2nd floor ballroom of the Iowa Memorial Union. The conference acts as a course for students to earn credit and engage with a range of speakers featured from on and off campus.

When words dance

The ballerina raises a slender leg, then bounds across the smooth floor. She transforms the lingering notes into movement. The scholar translates a sonnet. “Au revoir” becomes “adiós”; “adiós” becomes “goodbye.” Each interpretation shifts the form while the essence remains. This interpretation will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Friday as the UI Dance Department performs visual representations of works by International Writing Program residents. The free show will take place in North Hall Space/Place.

Coming out halfway around the world

One student is coming to terms with his sexuality halfway across the world. “In my hometown, there are some gay people I know. They never told others they are gays. They do not want to show their sexualities to others, so they pretend to be straight,” said University of Iowa student Shanyi Shang.

SASP to hold lecture on smallpox in Nepal on Nov. 19

The South Asian Studies Program (SASP) will be hosting a lecture by Susan Heydon titled, “Investigating Smallpox in Nepal.” The event is free and open to the public and will be held on Thursday, November 19th, from 4:30-6:00 pm in UCC 1117.

Mary Louise Pratt to deliver 6th Annual Charles A. Hale Lecture, Oct. 29

Mary Louise Pratt will deliver the 6th annual Charles A. Hale Lecture, "Linked In, Left Out, Uplifted, Downloaded: The ecology of language in a globalizing world," this Thursday, Oct. 29, from 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. in 1117 UCC.

Boren scholarship and fellowship workshop to be held Oct. 29

Boren Scholarships provide up to $20,000 to U.S. undergraduate and graduate students to study abroad in areas of the world critical to U.S. interests and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Cultural Incompetency: Racist Yik Yak posts target Asian students on UI campus

Masked by pseudonyms and anonymity, social media is often viewed as an attractive way to express one’s feelings candidly. But the same technology that allows users to share ideas and constructively engage with others too often devolves into a toxic, often hurtful environment. As social apps like Yik Yak, which allow users to anonymously share their opinions about anything and everything with those nearby, continue to gain popularity at the University of Iowa, many Asian-identifying students have found themselves the subject of racist and xenophobic messages.

Student Funding Alumni Spotlight: Patrick Reed

Patrick Reed graduated with a Master in Fine Arts in papermaking and bookbinding from the UI Center for the Book in 2013. He received a Fulbright grant in 2014 to the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany, for his project “Apocalyptic Themes of Natural Disaster in 16th and 21st Century Woodcut Prints.” He is currently back in Germany continuing his research through a DAAD Study Scholarship and Research Grant. International Programs interviewed Patrick to get his insights on living abroad, and how the experience affected his research.

The Reality of Homesickness

Homesickness hit me hard this past week, which marks a little less than two months since leaving home. When I was getting ready to leave, back in August, I knew I would miss some things while I was in Morocco, like my family, friends, dog, et cetera. But these aren't the things that bothered me the most– it's not hard to make a Skype call home. The real difficulty lies in a few things I never knew I would miss, little things that even though they wouldn't matter by themselves add up to make a big difference.