The University of Iowa

Tagged with "travel stories"

Chief Rabbi Ishak Haleva (left) receives a gift from Daily Iowan publisher Bill Casey (center) and David Perlmutter
8/13/2012

Eastern exposure: UI delegation travels to Turkey to learn about media and culture

A group of University of Iowa professors and local media professionals hope that their summer trip to Turkey was a cornerstone to building further relationships with educational institutions and media entities in that country. Led by David Perlmutter, director of the UI School of Journalism and Mass Communication, the group visited Turkey June 15-24 to learn about Turkish media and culture. The trip was hosted by the Niagara Foundation, an organization that promotes global fellowship. The Niagara Foundation paid for all costs except for airfare to and from Turkey and the registration fees, which attendees paid for individually.
8/13/2012

Iowa university president visits to promote exchange

Special to the China Post --University of Iowa President Sally Mason led a delegation to Taiwan last month, meeting with several local university heads to discuss interschool cooperation and to promote international cultural exchanges. There is a long history of Chinese students at the University of Iowa, Mason said, adding that two education ministers from the Republic of China — Yen Cheng-hsin and Wu Ching — graduated from the university.
students in India
7/31/2012

Magazine on U.S.-India relations features UI's India Winterim Program

SPAN Magazine: Bridging U.S.-India Relation, a publication produced by the U.S. Embassy in New Dehli, recently released an article on the University of Iowa's India Winterim Program. This 3-week UI course offers students an opportunity to study and participate with grass-roots organizations in India focused on social entrepreneurship, sustainability, public health and more.
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Meeting in Chengdu
7/28/2012

Lens on China: Notes on the state of Education

I wake with a start at 7:00 AM to the sound of the Chinese National Anthem through my window. Somehow its melodies seem too grand for a daily occurrence. Nevertheless, it plays faithfully over the school’s loudspeakers every morning; waking me like some patriot’s alarm clock. I lay in my bed, motivating my body to move while the children of Liewu Public Middle School stand to attention on the other side of the thin wall that separates my apartment building from the school courtyard...
My school district took the foreign teachers to an elegant hotpot restaurant
7/17/2012

Follow the Crowd: On Dining Out in China

My stomach growling in anticipation, I follow my nose and compliantly slip out of the drizzle into the bright restaurant to my right. It is astonishingly small, just a few tables packed snugly into a dingy storefront. The menus consist of single sheets of paper with lists of indecipherable Chinese characters, and though I always hope for menus with pictures, a good option for the illiterate eater in China is to find something you like and stick with it. In my case, this is the famous, the magical, Gong Bao ji ding (Kung Pao chicken).
students posing on bridge
7/6/2012

Building more than bridges in Nicaragua

This summer I spent six weeks in the village of Jucuapa Occidental, Nicaragua building a footbridge with Bridges to Prosperity and researching how different mixing methods affect the strength of concrete used in the bridge. The trip was a wonderful experience and although I learned a lot about construction and concrete, the lessons I learned from the people I met may be what I end up cherishing most.
food in china
7/6/2012

Follow the Flavor: The Wonderful World of Food in China

I’m not really one to be picky about the authenticity of ethnic food in America. Like all who have experienced its magic, I too was entranced by the bucatini all’amatriciana served up in the street cafes of Rome and Florence, but at the same time I can appreciate Olive Garden for what it is. I can sympathize with the difficulty of re-creating beyond French borders the delicate flakiness of a croissant or the perfect baguette (soft, light interior + crunchy crust), and am equally forgiving of Tex-Mex (my favorite and most dearly missed cuisine when I’m abroad). As a rule, as long as it’s tasty, I will accept it with an open mind and mouth. Until China.
Cat Gaa in Spain
7/3/2012

Former UI student reflects on 5 years of teaching in Spain

My Spain story starts like many others: a stint abroad learning Spanish during college turned must-eat-tortilla-de-patatas-like-my-senora-makes-daily cravings turned boarding a plane exactly four months after graduation, Madrid-bound story. I figured I’d be a better journalist if I had more experience abroad and spoke better Spanish.
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Lauren Katalinich
6/22/2012

You Look Just Like George Bush: Being White in China

“Being white” is not something I really think about on a daily basis and, like a lot of people, talking about race makes me cringe just a little bit. But once in China I soon realized that my entire experience would be shaped by this part of my identity that I have rarely been concerned with- the fact that I was white. And not only white, but 5 foot 9'' with sandy blonde hair and blue eyes.