The University of Iowa

Tagged with "student reflections"

12/20/2012

Student Reflections on Race and Ethnicity: From small town Iowa to China

I was born in the United States, and my parents are from Vietnam. During my first year of college, some people mistook me as Chinese, but most people can guess Vietnamese from my last name. I guess I should have mentally prepared to mistaken as Chinese more because from the moment I stepped into the boarding room, a Chinese lady asked me (in Chinese, of course) to help her read her boarding ticket.
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10/8/2012

Student Reflections on Race and Ethnicity: Star Side of Bird Hill

The research fellowship support through the Stanley Graduate Award for International Research was invaluable to the progress I made on my project. Over the course of the two months that I spent in Barbados, I was able to complete a first draft of my thesis project, a novel set in Barbados, Star Side of Bird Hill. The novel follows two girls, age 10 and 16 as they spend the summer in Barbados with their grandmother.
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6/29/2012

Student Reflections on Race and Ethnicity: International students abroad

When I was a freshman, the idea of studying abroad really seemed odd to me because I thought that I was already abroad in the United States, enjoying the abundant academic resources. Even though I have a childhood dream to visit Italy, I suppressed my enthusiasm and convinced myself to stick to my graduation plan and budget. Nonetheless, I realized that nothing could quench my yearning to study abroad, especially after learning Italian for one year and a half.
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6/29/2012

Student Reflections on Disabilities: A learning curve

When I first arrived in Wales I was nervous and a little scared. I had just taken a long journey across the ocean and was now standing in a city I knew virtually nothing about. I didn’t know how to get to the train station, to Swansea, nor the place I’d be living for the next five months. Fortunately, there were friendly people to help me out. Yes, I’m sure I looked silly dragging my bags around from bus to bus asking the driver exactly where it went but now I look back on it with pride. I had no idea what I was doing but I did it anyway and it all worked out. I made it to my flat and was exhausted!
4/23/2012

Student Reflections on First-Generation Abroad: A valuable idea

Being a first generation student, my family was new to the whole college experience and all the opportunities I had available to me, including studying abroad. At first, my parents did not understand the benefits of going abroad or why I even wanted to. My mom was mostly worried about me going to a different country, especially a third world country, with nobody she knew and no cell phone to contact me. Both my parents could not relate so I spent a lot of time convincing them to take studying abroad seriously and that studying abroad was a valuable idea. After much discussion, they began to understand how this is a once in a lifetime opportunity I needed to take advantage of while I still can as a student.
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12/21/2011

Student Reflections on Disabilities: Visual Impairment

At the beginning I was very frustrated, I wish I would have been more prepared to answer questions. It was not easy explaining my impairments in another language. Also, I was not prepared for the doubt I would have to face from other people. I could see the worry in their eyes when I brought my bike home for the first time. The teachers would ask me everyday if the print in the book was too small. Looking back at it now, it was a tough first few weeks. I really had to give it my all in order to make people believe that I was fully capable of doing everything that a sighted person can do.
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12/21/2011

Student Reflections on First-Generation Abroad: Pearl Harbor to Hiroshima

Going to the different peace museums in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was one of the most interesting things I have ever been able to do. To see and hear the stories about what took place at Pearl Harbor and the atomic bomb was a great experience. Most people, especially minorities don’t think that trips like this are in their reach. Money is always an issue so they just give up on the idea. They just need to be told and motivated that there are ways to make things happen.
12/21/2011

Student Reflections on First-Generation Abroad: Unforgettable opportunities

Being a first-generation student, my family was pretty new to the whole college experience and the great opportunities of studying abroad. My father had always said, “Well can’t you learn French here?” while my mother tried to hide the emotions of not seeing her son for three whole months. After explaining to my parents the great opportunities and experiences that I would gather during my time in Europe, they were fully supportive. (Oh yeah, and some basic training on how to use Skype).
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12/21/2011

Student Reflections on First-Generation Abroad: Setting an example

Not only can an opportunity such as this help students learn more in their relative field(s) of study, but at the same time this experience can help students to understand other cultures and lfiestyles around the world, which in my opinion is something you cannot be taught. Being the first generation in my family to attend a University, and now to have studied outside the U.S., I feel like I have set an example for my family and friends to hopefully follow in the future.
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12/21/2011

Brigid Freymuller Reflects on Race and Ethnicity: Classical Language and an appreciation of diversity

I did not see another Asian child at school until junior high, thus making diversity a very difficult and painful concept for me to grasp; however, I came to realize that everyone is different in their own special way, and although other kids made fun of me for my physical differences up until high school, I took these experiences, and they helped shape my much broader view of humanity and our role in the international arena.