The University of Iowa

Tagged with "Stanley Award for International Research"

7/17/2015

Naomi Jackson returns to I.C. for debut novel

Naomi Jackson knows better than anyone that Iowa City and Barbados don’t have a lot in common. Born to West Indian parents and graduating from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Jackson has spent a great deal of time in both locations. Despite a disparity in similarity, the confluence of the two led to Jackson’s Barbados-based debut novel, “The Star Side of Bird Hill.” You can hear Naomi read from her novel at Prairie Lights Bookstore in Iowa City on July 20.
5/12/2015

UI grad student awarded Fulbright to study Korean book and paper making methods

Steph Rue, of Cleveland, OH, has been awarded a Fulbright grant to conduct research in Seoul, South Korea for 2015-16. Rue, who will graduate this May with an M.F.A. in Book Arts/Center for the Book from the University of Iowa, will focus her research on early monastic paper and book production methods, as well as the historical techniques and the spiritual underpinnings of Korean bookmaking.
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Brett Burk
5/1/2015

UI student awarded Fulbright grant to teach English in Taiwan

Brett Burk, of Oskaloosa, IA, has been awarded a Fulbright U.S. Student Award to pursue an English Teaching Assistantship in Taiwan for 2015-16. Burk graduated from the University of Iowa in December 2014 with a B.A. in linguistics and an emphasis in TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language).
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4/30/2015

Phil's Day 2015

Phil’s Day 2015 is a day to celebrate philanthropy and the impact it has on the University of Iowa. These are just a few of the many UI students who were able to study or conduct research abroad in the past year, gaining invaluable experiences and memories that enhanced their education and lives, thanks to the generosity of private donors. Read on to learn about their unique adventures and projects.
2/9/2015

Cedar Rapids engineering major develops solar stoves in India

Allison Kindig is a senior from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, studying industrial engineering, global health studies and business administration at the University of Iowa. Two years ago, she was the recipient of a Stanley scholarship to travel to Cameroon. Since then, she addressed economical solar energy as a UI College of Engineering Grand Challenge Scholar. This fall, Kindig was named the 2014 Iowa Homecoming Queen. Read on to learn more about Allison's journey throughout her college experience.
1/8/2015

The intersection of language, culture, and identity

In a guest opinion column for the Iowa City Press-Citizen, UI graduate student Eli Asikin-Garmager reflects on his two months living in a village in Indonesia where he conducted research on a local language and completed requirements toward his graduate degree in linguistics. The language found on Lombok Island in Eastern Indonesia — called Sasak — is spoken by some 2.5 million people, but relatively little documentation of the language exists.
1/8/2015

From Rudolf to reindeer herding

Kelsey Frisk, a senior at the University of Iowa, lived in Malå from January through July as part of the study abroad program. There, she researched policies and cultural issues affecting the Sámi people. Her research included investigations of herders practicing reindeer husbandry, who she said make up about 10 percent of the Sámi people.
11/5/2014

Korean hanji: a disappearing craft

Steph Rue, an MFA candidate in Book Arts/Center for the Book at the University of Iowa, spent last summer studying the role of Buddhist spirituality in Korean papermaking in South Korea. The making of Korean paper, or "hanji," is an ancient craft that played an integral and often sacred role in the lives of Koreans for over 1,500 years. Like many traditions, Korean hand papermaking is rapidly declining, with only a few remaining masters of the craft. The purpose of Steph's research was to explore the sacred and spiritual role of hand papermaking in Korea before this important craft disappears.
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10/1/2014

UI teaching assistant researching rare Lao language

“I study linguistics, and generally, we’re trying to figure out what’s possible, what’s impossible, and trying to understand why some things are impossible and never seen. And along with that, trying to understand what those limits can tell us about our brain, cognition, how we think, things like that.”