The University of Iowa

Tagged with "Mexico"

10/11/2012

Symposium explores the culture, history, art, and struggles of the Latinos in the Midwest

Vicki Ruiz knows Latino culture. “Latinos are the biggest minority group in the United States, but their contributions and legacies in the United States often remain invisible to the general public and contribute to the unfortunate notion that Latinos are peoples who arrived the day before yesterday,” said the professor of history and Chicano/Latino Studies. Around 16 percent of the United States is made up of Latinos, and that demographic is only going to grow, according to the 2010 Census. Being the fastest growing minority group in the United States, it is estimated that this 16 percent will jump up to 30 percent by 2050.
10/10/2012

Our View: UI would benefit from a program in Latino Studies

The results of the 2010 census show that Latinos now make up the largest ethnic minority group in Iowa. In recent years, the University of Iowa has responded to that demographic shift by expanding its outreach to prospective students of Latino heritage, hiring faculty members with expertise in Latino issues and supporting research on Latinos.
5/14/2012

30 countries and counting: Pharmacy grad Lukas to continue global health pursuits

The trip across the stage to collect her diploma will be the shortest leg on the journey so far for Stephanie Lukas. Just two weeks ago she was in West Africa, completing an elective rotation for her pharmacy degree. During four weeks in Liberia studying the pharmacy system and ways to improve it, she met with the ministry of health’s medication supply chain manager, interviewed health care providers and patients, and participated in a training session for pharmacy workers who dispense medications. She set up the rotation herself, in collaboration with Lloyd Matowe, University of Iowa assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and founder of the nongovernmental organization Pharmaceutical Systems Africa.
12/21/2011

Staff Reflections on Disabilities Abroad - Being Blind in Mexico

"What am I doing here?" That question plagued me on that hot September day in 1982 when I first set foot in the house where I would be living with other participants on a Central College study abroad program in Mérida, Mexico. Blind from birth, I was accustomed to quickly taking in and adapting to new environments. But the open spaces, high ceilings, and large rooms so typical of Mérida's colonial architecture made this place feel like anything BUT home.
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