The University of Iowa

Tagged with "Iraq"

Yasir Mohsin
12/11/2014

Baghdad in the mist

Three years after his arrival, Yasir Mohsin is fully integrated into the University of Iowa's substantial Iraqi community, 23 graduate and post-doctorate scholars in fields from geology to dentistry, along with their families. Some have made families here; most are sponsored by an Iraqi government initiative that pays for students' educations under the strict terms that they return to Iraq upon completion of their degrees. The students started arriving in 2011, as U.S. troops marked their official exit from Iraq, under improved security conditions, on Dec. 21, 2011. Most Iraqis anticipated returning with their degrees to a safer, more peaceful country.
4/30/2013

Turkish official wants to expand influence in Iowa and US

Nearly 6,000 miles from Iowa City, Turkey acts as a bridge between Europe and Asia, and it is now looking to become more of a partner with the United States. “When you look from the shift in politics from the west to the east, Turkey is in the middle of that,” said Fatih Yildiz, the Turkish consul general in Chicago. Yildiz visited the University of Iowa on Monday to speak with students and faculty about creating those relationships at the state and local level.
8/20/2010

Scott King on The Iraq Education Initiative Aug. 26

After more than one year of planning and traveling some 12,000 miles round trip, Scott King is seeing the hard work pay off. King, assistant dean of International Programs for International Students and Scholars (OISS) at the University of Iowa, will discuss how the UI is one of the first Big Ten universities to welcome Iraqi students this fall as part of the Iraqi Education Initiative. He will share his insights at the debut of the 2010-11 Iowa City Foreign Relations Council luncheon-lecture series, which begins at noon Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010, at the Congregational Church, 30 N. Clinton St. in Iowa City.
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7/13/2010

NAFSA Member Prepares The University of Iowa to Welcome Iraqi Students

There’s been a lot of buzz about the new Iraqi Educational Initiative, as well there should be. The sheer number of expected students—50,000 over a five-year period—would capture anyone’s imagination. But coming from a nation that has been so marginalized for such a long period of time, the initiative can’t help but make one stop and think about what an impact this could have.
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