University of Iowa

Authored by Iowa City Press-Citizen

Photo of Brian Ekdale
2/5/2016

Program tackles questions of technology

Some believe new technologies are powerful forces that dictate social, cultural and political relations. These “technological determinists” focus on the technology itself, questioning whether it produces positive or negative outcomes in society. Others believe people use technologies in ways that suit existing goals and interests. These “social constructionists” think about new technologies as tools that can be seized, adapted and appropriated by the public. While there is plenty of middle ground between these two perspectives, this dichotomy draws attention to a key question in the study of new technologies. Who has the most power: technology or people? This question, and how it has been answered throughout history and around the world, will be central to an upcoming WorldCanvass discussion, featuring University of Iowa faculty from Communication Studies, Journalism & Mass Communication, and Computer Science. The program, “Encountering New Technology,” will be held at 5 p.m. Tuesday at Iowa City’s nonprofit cinema arts organization FilmScene on 118 E. College St. The program is free and open to the public.
Photo of Daniel Reed
1/23/2016

Scholarship essential for human progress

If the phrase "academic research" brings to mind tweedy professors poring over rare manuscripts or bespectacled scientists in lab coats examining glass beakers — you’re probably not alone. Nor is the stereotype entirely wrong; I’ve certainly dressed the part of rumpled geek during my career, to the occasional chagrin of my family. The prolonged and often unglamorous work of studying how social, economic and political forces shaped history, or how the universe operates down to the subatomic level and out at the furthest edges of space can seem mysterious, tedious and irrelevant to people outside of academia.
Jeffrey Ding
11/23/2015

UI Rhodes scholar a 'shining star,' mentors say

When teachers, mentors and professors describe Jeffrey Ding, there's not just one thing that stands out. On Sunday, the West High graduate and University of Iowa senior was announced as one of 32 American winners of the 2016 Rhodes scholarship, out of 869 applicants. He's also a former U.S. State Department intern, UI student government vice president, national high school debate champion and triple major in economics, political science and Chinese — and he's also getting a certificate in international business.
11/8/2015

Essential care absent in impoverished world

In order to ensure that mothers and children are getting the care they need in resource-poor areas, they must have access to appropriate care as close to their home as possible. One successful strategy to address this need is the training of community-level health workers to provide home-based counseling for pregnant women and their families to address social and cultural barriers to facility-based childbirth as well as provide basic newborn care and referrals for sick newborns. A great example of this work was the development of an easy-to-use eToolkit, or digital library, to train field workers on a number of health-related topics, including maternal and newborn health. This program was led by the Bangladesh Knowledge Management Initiative, which is directed by UI College of Public Health alumna Rebecca Arnold who helped develop and implement this project based on the skills and expertise she gained while completing her Master’s Degree in the Department of Community and Behavioral Health. Currently, the department is partnering with organizations in Bangladesh and India to explore how to best engage families and communities to improve access to and use of maternal and newborn care.
9/11/2015

Digital age has enhanced "Don Quixote"

2015 marks the 400th anniversary of the publication of "Don Quixote," volume two. Cervantes’ masterpiece is widely considered to be the first novel, but is best known for the comic duo of the crazy knight-errant, Don Quixote, and his chubby squire, Sancho Panza, whose down-to-earth simplicity makes his master’s flights of fancy even more ridiculous. Centuries after they first appeared in print, these two characters continue to inspire new artistic production throughout the world, in art, music and film. The digital age has only enhanced their popularity, as a new generation re-envisions the knight and squire in video games and graphic novels.
7/21/2015

UI basketball player keeps up her game abroad

Kali Peschel was able to do everything she planned during her six-week study abroad trip to Spain this summer. Peschel immersed herself in the foreign culture, she experienced a different way of life and took in the sights during her stay in the town of Valladolid. The Iowa senior also got to do something she never expected during stay in Spain — she got to play a little basketball.
7/17/2015

Naomi Jackson returns to I.C. for debut novel

Naomi Jackson knows better than anyone that Iowa City and Barbados don’t have a lot in common. Born to West Indian parents and graduating from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Jackson has spent a great deal of time in both locations. Despite a disparity in similarity, the confluence of the two led to Jackson’s Barbados-based debut novel, “The Star Side of Bird Hill.” You can hear Naomi read from her novel at Prairie Lights Bookstore in Iowa City on July 20.
Johnson Country community ID
4/13/2015

Johnson County approves community ID program

The Johnson County Board of Supervisors on Thursday unanimously approved the creation of a community ID program, the first of its kind in the Midwest and one that supporters say will help bring hundreds of local residents out of the shadows. "I just think that this is an incredible, historic day in Johnson County," Jesse Case, Community ID Group member and president of the Iowa City Federation of Labor, said to the supervisors after the vote. "I've never seen a city with elected officials so willing to come together and work with people for an issue like this."
3/11/2015

International Women’s Day: Now more than ever

Every year, for decades now, the Iowa United Nations Association has held Night of 1,000 Dinners in honor of International Women’s Day. Over these decades, the role that we have played in Iowa City as proponents of international cooperation has shifted. It used to be that our role was to connect Iowans to an international community that seemed so far away and hard to reach. Now, the world has brought the international playing field to our doorstep. International cooperation is our goal not only abroad (“out there”), but also here, here in our state, here in our city, here in our schools.