The University of Iowa

Domestic student profile: Ashley Morrow

November 12th, 2019

As part of International Education Week 2019, Ashley Morrow is one of seven University of Iowa students chosen by a committee of students to be recognized for their leadership and engagement in international education on campus and abroad

Ashley Morrow has participated in multiple study abroad programs, including: Summer 2018 Minority Health and Health Disparities International in Romania; Fall 2018 USAC San Sebastian, Spain; Spring 2019 USAC San Ramon, Costa Rica; and Summer 2019 United States-Indonesia Summer Studies Language Fellowship. Ashley has worked as a Hawkeye guide on campus for first-year and transfer students, and now works as a peer assistant in the Study Abroad Office and is a diversity ambassador for Study Abroad.

“Studying abroad encouraged me to adapt to different situations whether it was navigating a language barrier or getting lost abroad. The most valuable thing I learned was how to become more flexible and patient.”

Name: Ashley Morrow
Field of study: global health studies and Spanish, minor in Latino/a studies
Hometown: St. Louis, Missouri

What experiences/organizations/programs have you contributed to your international education?

During Summer 2018, I participated in an international public health research program called The Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training Program (MHIRT) in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. After this experience I spent my Fall 2018 semester studying abroad in San Sebastian, Spain, taking courses in Spanish language and culture. During Spring 2019, I continued my Spanish language studies in San Ramon, Costa Rica. My programs in Spain and Costa Rica were offered through the Study Abroad Office here at the University of Iowa. After, I studied Indonesian language and culture in Yogyakarta, Indonesia through the United States—Indonesia Summer Studies Program.

What is the most valuable thing that you have learned through your international education experiences?

I think that the most valuable thing that I learned was how to become more flexible and patient. Studying abroad encouraged me to adapt in different situations whether it was navigating a language barrier or getting lost abroad, being patient and flexible in these situations were key to creating a positive experience for myself.

If you had one message to pass on your fellow classmates about international education, what would it be? 

I would encourage everyone to step outside their comfort zone and seek to gain an understanding of people and cultures that are different from themselves. Not only will this help when forming relationships with new people but, it will also help maintain and cultivate the relationships that you already have.

Author