The University of Iowa

Tagged with "commentary"

Jordyn Reiland
8/2/2013

Reiland: Saying goodbye to Beijing

Jordyn Reiland, who is spending the summer interning for the China Daily newspaper in Beijing, recounts her final days in China, including a trip to the Great Wall. Although she was neither mentally nor physically prepared for the challenge of climbing the wall, Jordyn describes the feeling of making it to the top and what it meant for her to follow in the footsteps of her great grandparents.
Adrien and the rest of the Iowa group stop for a picture in Petra
7/29/2013

From Istanbul to Amman: Managing Study Abroad during a Hot Summer

Summer 2013 turned out to be more exciting than normal for the law school’s study abroad program. Professor Adrien K. Wing fielded several obstacles that prevented students from following their original itinerary, but in the end the new program went through as if it had been planned for months rather than days.
Dr. Oral stands with a few of her Turkish colleagues
6/19/2013

University of Iowa Child Protection Program

The University of Iowa has a long history of leadership in the field of child protection. In the 1970s, Dr. Gerald Solomons, the then-director of the Child Abuse Clinic, spearheaded the establishment of a four-state network of child protection training and program development in Iowa, Missouri, Minnesota, and Nebraska. Under his leadership, Iowa drafted and passed its first child protection law in the 1970s – one of the earliest states doing so.
Author 
Nicole Nisly
5/2/2013

'Transitioning,' both as a doctor and a human being

I met my patient whom I will call “Luna” about three years ago. She identified as a transwoman and had transitioned about 10 years earlier — after living most of her adult life identifying as a man, having been married and raising now adult sons and daughters. I feel it necessary to describe my initial sense of discomfort. Having practiced medicine for more than 30 years, I have met patients from a multitude of backgrounds and nationalities. I enjoy a collaborative practice with my patients, and I love to incorporate their philosophical and cultural beliefs into their health care. Yet, I felt uncomfortable caring for her.
Kao Kalia Yang
3/25/2013

Reflective commentary on refugees in the heartland

My grandma, Youa Lee, an old Hmong woman who traveled from the mountains of Laos, through the refugee camps of Thailand, to the hot fields of California and the cold factories of Minnesota, was 93 when she died. My grandma was a refugee from America’s Secret War in Laos. A widow with nine children, she raised seven sons into men and two daughters into women. She would become the root of a tree that carries the fruit of more than 300 descendants.
Phillip Round
3/7/2013

Attending to the written record of Native peoples

In October 1833, a book purporting to be the autobiography of the famous Sauk and Fox leader, Black Hawk, appeared in Cincinnati. In the 1830s, Euro-Americans were clamoring for “Indian stories,” and this volume of recollections by the principal warrior in what became known as the Black Hawk War — whose final battle was pitched on the Mississippi River between Iowa and Illinois — was an instant sensation. Although some contemporary reviewers dismissed the book as the fabrication of Antoine Le Claire, the biracial (French-Canadian/Potawatomi) founder of Davenport, others continued to believe in its authenticity, their views bolstered by the undeniable fact that in the 1830s there were many books written and published by Native Americans — books recounting Native writers’ objections to the Jackson administration’s policy of removal, the erosion of their treaty rights, or often simply their life stories.
Thomas Gallanis at Oxford
2/4/2013

A Year at All Souls

One of my referees (based at Yale) told me candidly that I should not be disappointed by a rejection, for no one he had recommended had ever been accepted. When the letter came from the College, it was in a thin envelope. My heart sank, for thin envelopes rarely contain good news. To my surprise, this one did. From the dean of visiting fellows, the letter began with the words "I am pleased to invite you...." And to my delight, the invitation was for not one, not two, but three Oxford terms -- a full academic year.
Daniel Reed
2/4/2013

Understanding the World through Genetics and New Technologies

Like all new technologies, genetic medicine brings a new set of societal questions. If DNA sequencing uncovers an untreatable genetic defect, do you want to know? It is not a hypothetical question; we are already facing this ethical dilemma for selected diseases. Because you are genetically similar to your siblings, what are the implications for them if you fit a particular disease profile? What is the appropriate ethical and economic balance between personalized health care treatment and cost, particularly if you choose a lifestyle that worsens your health, given a genetic predisposition to a disease? How do we protect individual privacy in a world of “big data” and inexpensive health monitoring devices?