University of Iowa

Tagged with "China"

12/22/2015

Yu Hua Tells a Couple of Jokes

Yu Hua, considered by many to be China’s greatest living author, begins his remarks with a joke. Brothers, a novel he calls his most important, has received critical acclaim abroad but encountered mixed reviews at home. International critics, under the pretense that Chinese critiques of the book were government-sponsored, flock furiously to the novel’s defense. In fact, Yu Hua sheepishly concludes, the negative assessments were offered spontaneously and freely by the Chinese public.
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polluted days in beijing
12/7/2015

All the Smog We Cannot See

Part I. Tell Me How I’m Supposed to Breathe in This Air The first thing I check every morning is the U.S. Embassy’s AQI (Air Quality Index). This Tuesday, the AQI reads “beyond index” (>500 AQI), which is a diplomatic way of saying “deathly.” The annoying lump in my throat and its companion “Beijing cough” reappears. When I look outside, I wonder if I have been transported back to the 1950s to London’s Smog Menace when couples kissed with their masks on and people relied on the blind to lead them home. I can’t help but question why I chose to study here, a decision that will probably cost me in life expectancy.
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Jeffrey Ding
11/23/2015

UI Rhodes scholar a 'shining star,' mentors say

When teachers, mentors and professors describe Jeffrey Ding, there's not just one thing that stands out. On Sunday, the West High graduate and University of Iowa senior was announced as one of 32 American winners of the 2016 Rhodes scholarship, out of 869 applicants. He's also a former U.S. State Department intern, UI student government vice president, national high school debate champion and triple major in economics, political science and Chinese — and he's also getting a certificate in international business.
Jeffrey Ding
11/23/2015

UI senior Jeffrey Ding named Rhodes scholar

University of Iowa student Jeffrey Ding says he’s unsure yet how being named a Rhodes scholar will change his life, but he’s already getting more than the usual number of friend requests on Facebook. Ding, a senior from Iowa City, was selected as one of 32 American Rhodes scholars on Nov. 22 from a field of 869 applicants; 90 are named worldwide. He’ll receive $50,000 annually for two years and will have the opportunity to attend Oxford University in England.
Jeffrey Ding
11/23/2015

UI student wins Rhodes scholarship to Oxford

An Iowa City native studying economics and international relations, with a focus on finding ways to promote environmental cooperation between the U.S. and China, has been named a 2016 Rhodes scholar. West High School alumnus Jeffrey Ding was among 32 Americans who were chosen out of 869 applicants for the scholarship to attend Oxford University in England. In addition to economics, Ding is also studying political science and Chinese at the University of Iowa. Ding has said much of his studies have focused on looking into ways the two counties can work together on environmental issues.
11/23/2015

University of Iowa student wins Rhodes scholarship

An Iowa man studying economics and international relations, with a focus on finding ways to promote environmental cooperation between the United States and China, has been named a 2016 Rhodes scholar. Iowa City native Jeffrey Ding was among 32 Americans who were chosen out of 869 applicants for the scholarship to attend Oxford University in England.
Iowa City
11/22/2015

University of Iowa student wins Rhodes scholarship to Oxford

An Iowa man who is interested in economics and international relations is one of 32 American Rhodes Scholars who will have the opportunity to attend prestigious Oxford University in England. Iowa City native Jeffrey Ding was one of the winners announced Sunday out of 869 applicants. In addition to economics, Ding is also studying political science and Chinese at the University of Iowa.
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11/5/2015

Contemporary art in China: Zhang Enli

The last hundred years of isolation and political turmoil in China have denied its artists participation in the international art community. As such, China is often only referenced by its increasing economic and political power despite remarkable innovations in contemporary Chinese art. Although many artists were forced underground or killed during the Cultural Revolution, China’s artists are flourishing with increased access to global communication and information.
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