worldcanvass

On January 20, 2015, Joan Kjaer and her WorldCanvass guests kicked off the Unversity of Iowa's first theme semester "Food for Thought" with a discussion on food and its relationship to community, heritage, and identities. This is a "ReCap" of the event with access to see and hear the full program.

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The next WorldCanvass will explore the complicated and controversial issues surrounding the legality and use of tobacco and marijuana with a special focus on the tension between personal liberty and the public good. Host Joan Kjaer will moderate the conversation with guests from the fields of dentistry, psychiatry, pharmacy, public health, and law. The February 3 program begins at 5 p.m. at FilmScene and is free and open to the public

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The University of Iowa’s Food for Thought Theme Semester is a program that will launch Tuesday and run throughout the spring semester. It will connect academics, local communities and individual Iowans through something we can all relate to: food.

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The UI’s “Food for Thought” project—its first ever theme semester—offers a platform for engagement on campus and throughout the state around one of life’s constants…food. Join host Joan Kjaer at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, January 20 at FilmScene in downtown Iowa City as she and her guests discuss the ways in which food affects us as individuals and binds us as members of communities.

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On December 9, 2014, Joan Kjaer and her WorldCanvass guests discussed Gender and Identity. The program explored the sometimes evolving nature of self-identification, activism to create community and promote LGBTQ rights, and the ways in which LGBTQ individuals navigate their identities in different locations and cultural settings. This is a ReCap of the event with access to see and hear the full program.

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On November 18, 2014, Joan Kjaer and a panel of guests discussed “The Tenacious Cycle of Poverty, Hunger, and Disease” as part of a special edition of WorldCanvass. The program included the presentation of the 2014 International Impact Awards and followed with a screening of “The Last Hunger Year” at FilmScene. This is a ReCap of the event with access to see and hear the full program.

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We all have to begin shifting our expectations and biases. We have to lose the binaries that never existed in the first place (sexes at birth). We have to understand that gender identity needs to be celebrated and accepted as each individual feels most natural and not impose it and require it to match an assigned sex at birth. I invite you to attend a WorldCanvass discussion of gender and identity at 5 p.m. Tuesday at FilmScene, 118 East College St.

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Words like gender, identity, and sexuality are used to categorize individuals… they’re used to sort out qualities and characteristics and to group ‘like’ types together. They can refer to specific physical attributes, to sexual preferences, or to psychological affinities that may or may not reflect the socially-defined constructs of masculine and feminine traits and behaviors. Our guests on the December 9 WorldCanvass will explore what we mean by gender and identity and will help us understand how they affect the ways in which we see ourselves and others see us. The program, which is free and open to the public, begins at 5 p.m. at FilmScene, 118 East College Street in Iowa City.

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The University of Iowa celebrates International Education Week as an annual opportunity to promote global awareness and engagement and to feature the international opportunities offered on our campus and in our community. Today, as never before, education must be globally oriented to prepare Iowans and students from around the country and around the world to move confidently across borders, to interact effectively with people from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and to take pleasure in a life filled with inquiry and discovery.

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In rural India, water scarcity is the most obvious shared link between poverty, hunger and disease. According to the World Health Organization, 780,000 of the 10 million annual deaths in India are due to lack of basic health care amenities, such as effective sewage systems, elementary sanitation facilities and safe drinking water. Almost 90 percent of diarrhea cases are a result of contaminated water. When people have no ready access to water, their choices and freedom are constrained, and the results are far reaching.

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