Japanese contingent visits UI to study STEM initiative

Iowa’s STEM program garners interest abroad

This announcement originally appeared in Iowa Now


Jeffrey Weld, executive director of the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council, and Robert Yager, UI College of Education science education professor emeritus (center), meet with Japanese educators to discuss STEM education at Van Allen Hall on the UI campus as part of a three-day visit. Photo by Tim Schoon.

A group of educational leaders from various Japanese universities is visiting the University of Iowa to discuss Iowa’s Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) initiative and garner strategies and tactics to develop a STEM program in Japan.

The group arrived Thursday, Feb. 6 and will be in the community through Saturday, Feb. 8.

The Japanese contingent, leaders from the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council, and UI educators and administrators are gathering to discuss local and international STEM curricula and are taking an in-depth look at Iowa STEM happenings with trips to several Iowa City schools including Lincoln Elementary.

The visitors are also touring parts of the UI campus, including the UI's Center for Computer Aided Design.

Yoshisuke Kumano, professor of science education at Shizuoka University in Japan, is leading the Japanese delegation.

Iowa’s impressive STEM results and Kumano’s relationships with Robert Yager, professor emeritus of science education in the UI College of Education, and Jeffrey Weld, executive director of the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council, gave Kumano incentive to choose Iowa’s STEM program as a guide to Japan’s future STEM initiative.

"We are honored to host this distinguished group of visitors and to share best practices and insights about some of the STEM innovations happening on the UI campus and across the state," says P. Barry Butler, UI executive vice president and provost. "We at the UI are proud of our role in preparing so many students to contribute to society in a diverse array of careers such as education, engineering, environmental science, and health care."

See the full story on Iowa Now

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