"Sacred High City, Sacred Low City: Religious Sites in Two Tokyo Neighborhoods"

Date: 

October 24, 2013 - 4:00pm

Location: 

Gilmore Hall, 3rd Floor Atrium
http://www.uiowa.edu/~maps/g/gilh1.htm

Contact Name: 

Dongwang Liu

Contact Phone: 

319-335-1305

You are invited to a public lecture entitled "Sacred High City, Sacred Low City: Religious Sites in Two Tokyo Neighborhoods" By Steve Heine, Professor of Religion and History, Director of Institute of Asian Studies, Florida International University at 4:00 pm, Thursday, October 24, at 3rd Floor Atrium, Gilmore Hall, UI Campus. The lecture is co–sponsored by CAPS and UI Dept. of Religious Studies. Please contact dongwang–liu@uiowa.edu if you have any questions about attending the event.

hursday, October 24, 2013
Public lecutre: "Sacred High City, Sacred Low City: Religious Sites in Two Tokyo Neighborhoods"
By Steve Heine, Professor of Religion and History, Director of Institute of Asian Studies, Florida International University
Time: 4:00 – 5:30 p.m
Location: 3rd Floor Atrium, Gilmore Hall, The University of Iowa Campus.

Steven Heine is professor of Religious Studies and History and director of Asian Studies at Florida International University in Miami. An authority on Japanese religions, he has published two dozen books dealing with the history and thought of Zen Buddhism, especially its origins in China and spread to medieval Japan as seen in the life and thought of master Dogen as well as the role of religion in contemporary East Asian society.  Some of his works include The Zen Poetry of Dogen; Opening a Mountain; Did Dogen Go to China?; Zen Skin, Zen Marrow; Sacred High City, Sacred Low City; and the new book Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Koan in Zen Buddhism.

In Sacred High City, Sacred Low City: A Tale of Religious Sites in Two Tokyo Neighborhoods  (Oxford University Press), Steven Heine argues that lived religion in Japan functions as an integral part of daily life; any apparent lack of interest masks a fundamental commitment to participating regularly in diverse, though diffused, religious practices. The book uses case studies of religious sites at two representative but contrasting Tokyo neighborhoods as a basis for reflecting on this apparently contradictory quality. In what ways does Japan continue to carry on and adapt tradition, and to what extent has modern secular society lost touch with the traditional elements of religion? Or does Japanese religiosity reflect another, possibly postmodern, alternative beyond the dichotomy of sacred and secular, in which religious differences as well as a seeming indifference to religion are encompassed as part of a contemporary lifestyle?

You are invited to a public lecture entitled "Sacred High City, Sacred Low City: Religious Sites in Two Tokyo Neighborhoods" By Steve Heine, Professor of Religion and History, Director of Institute of Asian Studies, Florida International University at 4:00 pm, Thursday, October 24, at 3rd Floor Atrium, Gilmore Hall, UI Campus. The lecture is co–sponsored by CAPS and UI Dept. of Religious Studies. Please contact dongwang–liu@uiowa.edu if you have any questions about attending the event.


http://international.uiowa.edu/caps/lectures-and-events