Past Events - 2011

The Tunisian Revolution of 2011

When: Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2011, 6:30-8 p.m.
Where: 2520D, University Capitol Centre
Presented by: Asma Ben Romdhane, a Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant from Tunisia
Description: How did one young man’s protest spark the Tunisian Revolution of 2011? Asma Ben Romdhane will discuss events that led to the recent ousting of Tunisian President Ben Ali. She will address the role of Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and WikiLeaks in the revolution, and the reaction throughout the Arab world to these events. See the event poster

Baraza Series

The Swahili word “baraza” roughly translates to “meeting” or “forum” in English. The Baraza series brings a combination of UI and external scholars, graduate students, faculty and practitioners in various fields to the university for lectures on interdisciplinary research in African studies. All Baraza lectures are free and open to the public. See the event poster

When: Monday, March 7, 2011, 12-1 p.m.
Where: 1117 UCC
Who: Todd Cleveland, Augustana College, Rock Island, Ill.
Topic: "Following the Ball: African Soccer Players, Labor Strategies and Immigration across the Portuguese Colonial Empire, 1945-75"

When: Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Where: 315 Phillips Hall
Presented by: Aldin Mutembei (University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania)
Topic: “Poetry in the Time of AIDS: Kiswahili Poetry and the HIV-AIDS Pandemic”
- This talk is also sponsored by the UI Department of English in CLAS

When: Monday, April 4, 2011, 12-1 p.m.
Where: 1117 UCC
Who: Blandina Giblin and John Njue
Topic: "Home and abroad: Expanding opportunities for Swahili students at The University of Iowa”

When: Monday, April 18, 2011, 12-1 p.m.
Where: 1117 UCC
Who: Lyombe Eko
Topic: “The Networking Barbarians…eh…Berbers at the Internet Gateways: The “Facebook” Revolution of 2011 in North Africa, Power Relations, and the Gateway Model of Internet Regulation”

When: Monday, April 25, 2011, 12-1 p.m.
Where: 1117 UCC
Who: Allison McGuffie
Topic: "The Stability of Crisis: The Cycle of Need and Aid in African Educational Film"

When: Monday, May 2, 2011, 12-1 p.m.
Where: 1117 UCC
Who: Cliff Missen, WiderNet Project
Topic: "300 Libraries Later: A survey of how the eGranary Digital Library is faring in the field"

"A Celebration of East Africa" lecture series

This series is funded by the U.S. Department of Education through an Undergraduate Studies International and Foreign Language UISFL grant to the African Studies Program, the Middle East and Muslim World Studies scholarly group and IP.

When: Tuesday, March 22, 2011, 6-7:30 p.m.
Where: Public Library Room A
Presented by: Professor Valerie Hoffman (Department of Religion, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)
Topic: "Celebrating Muhammad, Remembering God: Sufism in Egypt"

When: Thursday, March 31, 2011, 5:00-6:30 p.m.
Where: 315 Phillips Hall
Presented by: Mohamed Said Salum (Independent Scholar)
Topic: "Christian Hegemony and the Rise of Muslim Militancy in Tanzania"

"A Symposium on the Future of Multi-Party Democracy in East Africa"

Conference schedule
When: April 1-2, 2011
Where: IP Commons, 1117 UCC
Featured participants:
Bernard Mapalala (journalist, Tanzania)
Joel Barkan (Center for Strategic and International Studies)
Joshua Rubongoya (Roanoke College)
Aili Mari Tripp (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Mohamed Said Salum (Independent Scholar, Tanzania)
James Brennan (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
Joe Lugalla (University of New Hampshire)

When: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 6-8:30 p.m.
Where: 14 Schaeffer Hall
Presented by: Pamela Kaduri (Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania)
Topic: “Research on Tobacco Addiction in Tanzania”

When: Tuesday, Apr. 26, 2011, 6-7:30 p.m.
Where: Public Library Room A
Presented by: Professor Scott Reese (History, Northern Arizona University)
Topic: “Salafi Transformations: The British Colony of Aden (Yemen) and the Changing Voices of Islamic Religious Reform in the Inter-War Indian Ocean"

“Some (Not so) Lost Aquatic Traditions: Goans Going Fishing in the Indian Ocean”

Presented by: Anthropologist Pamila Gupta
When: Friday, Nov. 11, from 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Where: 302 Schaeffer Hall.
See the event poster

Gupta will discuss how rituals enhance community and diasporic ties between Portugal, Mozambique, and Goa, India. She will focus on the role rituals play in re-creating sensual and bodily experiences and memories, and in representing notions of Goan popular culture, all to be passed onto subsequent generations of Goan Mozambicans.

Gupta is a senior researcher based at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. She is currently a visiting professor in the Department of Anthropology at the New School for Social Research in New York.

Presentations by Tanzanian social activists Annagrace Rwehumbizaand Richard Mabala

“It’s the Context Stupid: HIV-AIDS and the Vulnerabilities of Adolescent Girls in Tanzania”

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 15
Time: 12:30-1:45 p.m.
Location: 213 English Philosophy Building
Presented by: Annagrace Rwehumbiza

Annagrace Rwehumbiza is a lawyer and social worker who specializes in issues related to the health and rights of youth and women in Tanzania.

“You Can’t be Serious!: Writing Political Satire in Tanzania”

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 15
Time: 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Location: 315 Phillips Hall
Presented by: Richard Mabala

“Contested Development: Tanzania through the Eyes of Young People Fifty Years after Independence”

Date: Wednesday, Nov. 16
Time: 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Location: 315 Phillips Hall
Presented by: Richard Mabala

Richard Mabala is one of Tanzania’s most prominent political columnists and satirists. He is also a social worker specializing in youth issues and a prolific author of children’s books.

These presentations are funded by UI International Programs and the U.S. Department of Education through an Undergraduate Studies International and Foreign Language (UISFL) grant to the African Studies Program.

 

The struggle for LGBT rights in Uganda

Presented by: Rev. Mark Kiyimba, the founding minister of the Unitarian-Universalist Church in Kampala, Uganda
When: July 18, 2011 at 6:30 p.m.
Where: Iowa City Public Library, Room A

Rev. Mark Kiyimba, the founding minister of the Unitarian-Universalist Church in Kampala, Uganda, has received international attention for his stand against the anti-homosexuality bill that is now before the Ugandan parliament. According to the bill, those perceived as homosexual could be punished by life imprisonment or even death. The Unitarian-Universalist Church of Kampala held conferences in 2009 and 2010 to protest the bill. More than 200 people attended these conferences, including gay and lesbian Ugandans and their allies, risking possible arrest.

The Kampala Unitarian-Universalist Church is one of the few congregations in Uganda that welcomes gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.

Learn more about this event

 

“Technology and the Writer: Open Book and Closed Text”

Presented by: Wole Soyinka, Nobel Prize-winning Nigerian author
When: Sunday, Nov. 6 at 3:30 p.m.
Where: Shambaugh Auditorium, UI Main Library

A fierce defender of human rights and longtime advocate for democratic reforms, Soyinka has been jailed and exiled for his humanitarian stances. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1986 and is now a professor emeritus in comparative literature at Obafemi Awolowo University in Nigeria, as well as President’s Professor at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

The African Studies Program will present Soyinka with the Rex D. Honey African Studies Lectureship Award to recognize Soyinka’s outstanding contribution to world literature and his continuing advocacy of human rights reforms in Nigeria and around the globe.