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posted onFeb14, 2013

Name: Guilherme B. Prudente
Home country: Brazil
Currently attending: University of Iowa
Major: Computer science
Career aspirations: Game/App Developer
Graduation year: 2013

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posted onFeb13, 2013

The controversy over awarding of the Nobel Prize for literature to PRC author Mo Yan has uncovered old and bitter debates about the relationship between politics and literature. However, Chinese society and contemporary Chinese literature have come a long way since the Cold War, when those debates first flared up, and the possibilities for Chinese literature today are unprecedented.

In an upcoming public lecture, East Asian scholar Charles A. Laughlin will explain how Mo Yan and his generation have fundamentally changed the relationship between literature and politics in China, helping create a broader space for creativity and more vigorous engagement with world literature than ever before.

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posted onFeb12, 2013

An increasing number of University of Iowa students are choosing to not only study abroad but also to work and volunteer overseas. The university is ranked 46th, among schools of its size, in the number of students graduating and joining the Peace Corps.

The UI recently increased its response to this demand by creating a position specifically geared toward students wanting to work, intern, or volunteer abroad. The position has been in place for 18 months, and officials have seen good results.

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posted onFeb11, 2013

Fighting wanderlust after your study abroad experience? Just need more international travel in your life? We hear you!

That’s why we’re hosting Life after Study Abroad Wednesday, February 20 from 7:30- 8:30 p.m. in 1100 UCC for study abroad returnees and interested students to learn more about their international options outside of study abroad and after graduation.

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posted onFeb8, 2013

While many of us took time to relax and unwind over the holiday break, Professor Joann (Jo) Eland, PhD, RN, FAAN, was scrambling to finalize international travel plans while prepping to instruct a class that provides vital hospice and palliative care overseas.

On December 29, Dr. Eland and a group of 18 students (11 from the College of Nursing) embarked on multi-day journey that took them from Iowa City, to Chicago, to Abu Dhabi and ultimately to their final destination—a hospice in Trivandrum, India, a city located in the Southern tip of the country—where Eland taught a three-week course titled “Hospice, Pain and Palliative Care.”

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posted onFeb8, 2013

University of Iowa senior women's golfer Gigi DiGrazia was intrigued by an email she received last August for a class offered over winter break called “Diagnosing Diseases.”

DiGrazia, a health and human physiology major, wants to attend medical school, so this was right up her alley. The class would be worth three credits, offered over three weeks during winter break, and students would be working hands-on with doctors and physicians in diagnosing illnesses and other medical situations.

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posted onFeb7, 2013

Do international collaborations make for better science, or better scientists? This was one of the key questions raised at an event I attended this week, the first “Global Research Funding Forum,” hosted jointly by International Affairs and the Office of Research and Economic Development at the University of North Texas.

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posted onFeb4, 2013

One of my referees (based at Yale) told me candidly that I should not be disappointed by a rejection, for no one he had recommended had ever been accepted. When the letter came from the College, it was in a thin envelope. My heart sank, for thin envelopes rarely contain good news. To my surprise, this one did. From the dean of visiting fellows, the letter began with the words "I am pleased to invite you...." And to my delight, the invitation was for not one, not two, but three Oxford terms -- a full academic year.

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posted onFeb4, 2013

Like all new technologies, genetic medicine brings a new set of societal questions. If DNA sequencing uncovers an untreatable genetic defect, do you want to know? It is not a hypothetical question; we are already facing this ethical dilemma for selected diseases. Because you are genetically similar to your siblings, what are the implications for them if you fit a particular disease profile? What is the appropriate ethical and economic balance between personalized health care treatment and cost, particularly if you choose a lifestyle that worsens your health, given a genetic predisposition to a disease? How do we protect individual privacy in a world of “big data” and inexpensive health monitoring devices?

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posted onFeb1, 2013

The following lecture was delivered by Alexander Somek at the Princeton Transatlantic Youth Conference on December 6, 2012, in Princeton at Rockefeller College. The event was attended by students from both the US and Europe. Professor Somek is the Charles E. Floete Chair in Law at the University of Iowa College of Law, and currently a LAPA fellow at Princeton University.

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posted onFeb1, 2013

How did competitive, witty conversations at elite salons shape Spanish histories of the Iberian kingdom of al-Andalus? In the first lecture of the European Studies Group spring lecture series, UI associate professor Denise K. Filios will analyze the traces of such oral performances in two stories about Musa b. Nusayr, the conqueror of al-Andalus.

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posted onJan31, 2013

The UI Opera Studies Forum will present a pre-opera talk on Verdi’s Rigoletto on Wednesday, Feb. 13, at 5:30 p.m. in the University Capitol Centre, Room 2520D. This event is free and open to the public.

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posted onJan29, 2013

I’ve often thought that the best destinations are those that weren’t on your list. My experience as a Fulbright Senior Lecturer in the faculty of law at Sofia University certainly falls into that category. Unlike many of my Fulbright colleagues, I didn’t begin my experience with a particular country, or even region, in mind. Instead, I focused on trying to identify an award that was seeking someone with my background and skills, with a large degree of flexibility as to where that might be. Happily, this approach led to my selection as a Fulbright scholar and an incredible experience in a place I have grown quite fond of.

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posted onJan28, 2013

Come try your hand at the ancient and beautiful art of Chinese calligraphy at a free workshop Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013, from 7-8:30 p.m. in 1117 University Capitol Centre on the UI campus. The workshop is open to the public and no prior experience of Chinese or calligraphy is necessary to attend.

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posted onJan24, 2013

Jesse Skinner Wilkerson was a 33-year-old farmer from Hamburg, Iowa, when he was drafted to serve in the 13th Iowa Infantry, Company C. His wife, Sarahett, was pregnant with their third child and left to run the farm in his absence.

The year was 1864, and the U.S. was embroiled in a civil war that ultimately cost three-quarters of a million lives among the Union and Confederacy ranks. Wilkerson, by his reckoning, traveled over 5,000 miles to seven states during his service. Though he survived the war, he was murdered in a barroom in 1869, only four years after the war’s end.

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