Articles tagged with "worldcanvass"

posted onOct14, 2013

“The Rise of Public Opinion in China,” an upcoming international conference at the UI, will bring together leading scholars and distinguished guest speakers Friday and Saturday, October 18-19, 2013, on the University of Iowa campus.

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posted onOct3, 2013

Public opinion is inevitably linked with political action and political change in 21st century America. But the connection between public opinion and mass political action—or even institutional change—is not limited to the U.S. or Western democracies. On the contrary, it is an increasingly important and influential factor globally. WorldCanvass host Joan Kjaer and an expert panel of guests will discuss the rise of public opinion in China on the next WorldCanvass. The live event takes place on Friday, October 18, from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Senate Chamber of Old Capitol Museum. No tickets are required and the public is invited to attend.

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posted onSep18, 2013

John Manning, associate professor of tuba and euphonium at the UI, introduces the Series on Arts and Rights, or “SOAR,” program in this Press-Citizen commentary. John will join others on the season opener of WorldCanvass Friday, Sept. 20, when the topic is “The Arts as Vocabulary.”

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posted onSep6, 2013

The 2013-2014 season of International Programs’ WorldCanvass series begins Sept. 20 with a program focused on human rights and the arts.

Host Joan Kjaer and her guests will discuss ways in which the arts—both the performing and creative arts—serve as critical communicators on issues of human rights and freedom. The live event takes place on Friday, Sept. 20, from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Senate Chamber of the Old Capitol Museum. No tickets are required, and the public is invited to attend.

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posted onJun14, 2013

WorldCanvass recorded a discussion with a panel of international experts on interpersonal psychotherapy at the Old Capitol Museum on Thursday.

Experts say the University of Iowa is “at the forefront” of interpersonal psychotherapy because of its health-care system and hospitals.

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posted onJun11, 2013

Despite inflammatory political, religious, ethnic, and gender diatribes which argue for divisiveness, we are all humans. We are born, we die, and in between we form relationships. This is the essence of being human, and we share it with every other human being on the planet. We also suffer. The forms of our suffering vary across age, geography and circumstance, but we suffer nonetheless. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is one method of dealing with this suffering.

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posted onMay6, 2013

Although the term ‘interpersonal psychotherapy,’ or IPT, may not be as familiar to the lay person as ‘Freudian analysis’ or ‘cognitive behavior therapy,’ its use as a treatment for a variety of psychiatric disorders has steadily grown since its development more than three decades ago. On June 13, from 6-7 p.m. in the Senate Chamber of the Old Capitol Museum, WorldCanvass Studio host Joan Kjaer and a group of international experts will discuss IPT’s efficacy, explore cultural challenges to treatment, and compare and contrast the approach to psychological disorders and mental illness in the Canadian, Australian, and U.S. healthcare systems.

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posted onMay2, 2013

I met my patient whom I will call “Luna” about three years ago. She identified as a transwoman and had transitioned about 10 years earlier — after living most of her adult life identifying as a man, having been married and raising now adult sons and daughters. I feel it necessary to describe my initial sense of discomfort.

Having practiced medicine for more than 30 years, I have met patients from a multitude of backgrounds and nationalities. I enjoy a collaborative practice with my patients, and I love to incorporate their philosophical and cultural beliefs into their health care. Yet, I felt uncomfortable caring for her.

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posted onMar22, 2013

You may recognize her striking face from fashion spreads in Elle and Vogue or the Victoria's Secret runway, but Alek Wek has another story to tell. Not that of an international supermodel but of the struggles of life as a refugee.

On April 5, Wek will tell the story of her personal journey as a refugee and her current work with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) when she appears as a guest on International Programs’ WorldCanvass television and radio program as part of the UI Provost’s Global Forum on Refugees in the Heartland. WorldCanvass will be held in the Old Capitol Senate Chamber from 5 to 7 p.m., on Friday, April 5, 2013, and the public is invited to attend.

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posted onMar12, 2013

Who is a refugee? What distinguishes refugees from immigrants? When and how is refugee status recognized by nations and governments? How do refugee crises arise and what can be done to aid refugees in resettlement? What’s the history of refugee resettlement in the Midwest? These are just a few of the questions WorldCanvass guests will address on the April 5 program “Refugees in the Heartland.” The program takes place from 5-7 p.m. in the Senate Chamber of Old Capitol Museum and is free and open to the public.

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posted onMar7, 2013

In October 1833, a book purporting to be the autobiography of the famous Sauk and Fox leader, Black Hawk, appeared in Cincinnati. In the 1830s, Euro-Americans were clamoring for “Indian stories,” and this volume of recollections by the principal warrior in what became known as the Black Hawk War — whose final battle was pitched on the Mississippi River between Iowa and Illinois — was an instant sensation.

Although some contemporary reviewers dismissed the book as the fabrication of Antoine Le Claire, the biracial (French-Canadian/Potawatomi) founder of Davenport, others continued to believe in its authenticity, their views bolstered by the undeniable fact that in the 1830s there were many books written and published by Native Americans — books recounting Native writers’ objections to the Jackson administration’s policy of removal, the erosion of their treaty rights, or often simply their life stories.

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posted onFeb19, 2013

The stories of our lives and our histories are carried from one generation to the next through language. Whether spoken, signed, or written, languages are complex systems of communication that evolve over time and are rich with cultural and social meaning. As the centuries go by, some of the keys to understanding these languages and the cultures they reflect may be lost. On the March 8 WorldCanvass, we’ll investigate the painstaking work of uncovering and interpreting age-old documents and written records, and we’ll try to get a fuller picture of the people who produced them. WorldCanvass takes place before a live audience in the Senate Chamber of the Old Capitol Museum in Iowa City and is taped for television, radio and internet distribution. The program begins at 5 p.m., March 8, and is free and open to the public.

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posted onFeb4, 2013

Like all new technologies, genetic medicine brings a new set of societal questions. If DNA sequencing uncovers an untreatable genetic defect, do you want to know? It is not a hypothetical question; we are already facing this ethical dilemma for selected diseases. Because you are genetically similar to your siblings, what are the implications for them if you fit a particular disease profile? What is the appropriate ethical and economic balance between personalized health care treatment and cost, particularly if you choose a lifestyle that worsens your health, given a genetic predisposition to a disease? How do we protect individual privacy in a world of “big data” and inexpensive health monitoring devices?

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posted onJan24, 2013

Jesse Skinner Wilkerson was a 33-year-old farmer from Hamburg, Iowa, when he was drafted to serve in the 13th Iowa Infantry, Company C. His wife, Sarahett, was pregnant with their third child and left to run the farm in his absence.

The year was 1864, and the U.S. was embroiled in a civil war that ultimately cost three-quarters of a million lives among the Union and Confederacy ranks. Wilkerson, by his reckoning, traveled over 5,000 miles to seven states during his service. Though he survived the war, he was murdered in a barroom in 1869, only four years after the war’s end.

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