Articles tagged with "research"

posted onOct31, 2012

The lecture explores what the new form of warfare with mass armies that were mobilized by a national propaganda and needed the support of the civilian population meant for ordinary citizens. Because of its extraordinary significance, the Battle of Leipzig provides an excellent example for such a study. To understand the extend of the civilian war experiences and the different factors that formed it, the lecture will start in spring 1812, when the war started for the people in Saxony, after four relatively peaceful years, and will end in the summer of 1814, when the wars against Napoleon officially had come to an end, but the population still was confronted with the aftermath of the war. To remember the victims of these wars on the occasion of their 200th anniversary instead of celebrating the glorious military leaders seems to be appropriate for today.

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posted onOct26, 2012

This talk examines the role that historical narrative plays in the public relations agenda of corporate Japan. Most member companies of Japan’s 20th-century keiretsu (corporate conglomerates that included Mitsubishi, Mitsui, and Sumitomo) regularly published official histories as a means of enhancing corporate prestige and to evade critical discussion of their past indiscretions. As a result, company history narratives often obscure more than they illuminate about the corporate subject.

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posted onOct16, 2012

International Programs will host an information workshop regarding the Stanley Awards for International Research on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012, from 3:30-4:30 p.m. in 1117 University Capitol Centre. Undergraduates interested in international studies are especially encouraged to attend.

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posted onOct15, 2012

Professor, author, and researcher Ann Grodzins Gold will give a lecture Thursday, Oct. 25, from 4:00-5:30 p.m. in 2390 University Capitol Centre (the Executive Board Room) discussing the cultural impact on an Indian community of losing a river of great spiritual importance. The talk is titled, “From Snakes' Blood to Sewage: Mythology and Ecology of a Minor River in Rajasthan.”

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posted onOct11, 2012

Vicki Ruiz knows Latino culture.

“Latinos are the biggest minority group in the United States, but their contributions and legacies in the United States often remain invisible to the general public and contribute to the unfortunate notion that Latinos are peoples who arrived the day before yesterday,” said the professor of history and Chicano/Latino Studies. Around 16 percent of the United States is made up of Latinos, and that demographic is only going to grow, according to the 2010 Census. Being the fastest growing minority group in the United States, it is estimated that this 16 percent will jump up to 30 percent by 2050.

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posted onOct10, 2012

The results of the 2010 census show that Latinos now make up the largest ethnic minority group in Iowa.

In recent years, the University of Iowa has responded to that demographic shift by expanding its outreach to prospective students of Latino heritage, hiring faculty members with expertise in Latino issues and supporting research on Latinos.

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posted onOct8, 2012

This summer, Naomi Jackson, a recipient of the Stanley Graduate Award for International Research, traveled to the island of Barbados to conduct research and continue work on her novel and MFA thesis project, which is set on the Caribbean island. In this reflection, Naomi shares her thoughts on the experience and the importance of her personal research to the final product of her first novel. (Photo, top left, credit: Sophia Wallace)

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posted onOct3, 2012

Luke Juran recently conducted research in post-disaster water sanitation in India through a Fulbright grant. In this video, he shares what inspired his project and how he gave back to the community while exploring the local culture.

Keywords: Fulbright, India
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posted onSep27, 2012

For those interested in applying for grants through the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service), DAAD San Francisco Representative Leslie Harlson will be offering a workshop using Skype on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012, from 3:30-5:00 p.m. in International Commons, 1117 UCC. The workshop will provide an overview of the types of grants offered and the application process, followed by a live question-and-answer session. All students intending to apply for a DAAD grant this year are strongly encouraged to attend. The workshop is free and open to the public. Interested students and faculty are requested to R.S.V.P by Oct. 1 to Karen Wachsmuth, academic programs and student services administrator, International Programs, at karen-wachsmuth@uiowa.edu.

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posted onSep24, 2012

How severely is the world’s energy consumption affecting the health of its communities?

There is a growing consensus on the part of the global community that a reevaluation of energy needs and mechanisms to produce energy is imperative. Using the lens of health impacts as the focus, this year’s Global Health Studies conference, “Energy and Global Health on a Sick Planet,” will explore current challenges and potential remedies to global energy needs.

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posted onSep24, 2012

Join the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies for its 25th Anniversary Speaker Series this fall, featuring prominent scholars of East Asian studies. All events are free and open to the public.

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posted onSep13, 2012

The long history of Latino presence in the Midwest and the changing demographics of our region will be among the topics discussed on the October 5 WorldCanvass program, The Latino Midwest. The free program will take place in Room 2780, University Capitol Centre from 5-7 p.m. and the public is invited to attend. WorldCanvass is produced by International Programs and hosted by Joan Kjaer.

Keywords: history, English, Spanish
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posted onSep7, 2012

The European Studies Group (ESG) is hosting a luncheon talk featuring speaker Stephanie Mueller at noon on Friday, Sept. 14, in 2520C University Capitol Centre. The title of the talk is “A Ghost, a Jester, and a Bird: Three Metaphors of ‘Subversion’ among Conflicting Nationalisms in Contemporary Spain.”

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posted onAug17, 2012

Given the importance of ensuring that students graduate on time and are equipped to be successful in their careers, and given the emphasis the University of Iowa is giving to student success, my earlier post addressed the connections between study abroad and student success. Since then, the number of students studying abroad has gone up a bit: now over 20% of UI undergraduates study abroad at some point during their time at the University, which is a significant and encouraging number. However, as I noted previously, the study abroad population remains strongly female, and there is still significantly lower participation among minorities than among white students.

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posted onJul31, 2012

SPAN Magazine: Bridging U.S.-India Relations-a publication produced by the U.S. Embassy in New Dehli- recently released an article on the University of Iowa's India Winterim Program. This 3-week UI course offers students an opportunity to study and participate with grass-roots organizations in India focused on social entrepreneurship, sustainability, public health and more.

Keywords: India
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