Articles tagged with "international visitors"

posted onFeb23, 2012

Two visiting faculty members will give presentations as part of a Latin American Studies Program (LASP) panel discussion, titled “The Americas Transformed: The Legacies of the 1960s.” This event will take place Thursday, March 1, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in 1117 University Capitol Centre. It is free and open to the public.

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posted onFeb23, 2012

The Kenneth J. Cmiel Funded Human Rights Internship Program provides funding to selected University of Iowa students who have secured a summer internship with a local, national, or international non-governmental organization or governmental agency engaged in human rights related advocacy, research or education. Program funds cover travel and living expenses associated with the internship.

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posted onFeb20, 2012

The African Studies Program in International Programs will hold a spring 2012 meet-and-greet event Monday, Feb. 27, at 5 p.m. in 2520D University Capitol Centre. The event is free and open to the public.

The aim of the meeting is for faculty and staff of the African Studies Program to gather, introduce new faculty and students, and discuss programing for the rest of the academic year.

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posted onFeb20, 2012

UI junior Angeline See longs to craft her dream business — a bakery chock-full of delicious and colorful Asian desserts. But the native of Malaysia found out her endeavors may be postponed last fall when applying for an office space at the Bedell Entrepreneurship Learning Laboratory.

International students are prohibited from self-employment while on student visas. So for students like See, the only chance at launching a business would be finding a native student to partner with.

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posted onFeb17, 2012

MUSCATINE — Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, and Muscatine.

The eastern Iowa town of around 20,000 might seem in odd company, but it’s no accident that Iowa is one of the stops on Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping’s U.S. trip this week.

Xi visited Muscatine — the same town he visited in 1985 — and Des Moines Wednesday night.

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posted onFeb16, 2012

This 27-member performing arts troupe from Shanghai, China, features folk dancing of Dai Minority and Uygher Minority, Tang and Han dynasty dance, Dunhuang dance, Sichuan opera, singing, and various instruments including the lute, erhu , flute, and piano.

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posted onFeb16, 2012

Chinese students are studying at Iowa’s two largest public universities in record numbers. The University of Iowa welcomed 1,737 students from China in fall 2011 — half its international student population. The numbers are similar at Iowa State University (ISU), which enrolled 1,849 Chinese students (54 percent of all international students). Each school has an enrollment of about 30,000, and international students make up 11 percent of each campus.

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posted onFeb15, 2012

The University of Iowa has seen a surge in Chinese student enrollment. Just over half of the UI international student population is from China (1,737 students) and numbers have increased dramatically in the past five years.

Keywords: China
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posted onFeb13, 2012

Iowans and Chinese say ties have been strengthened over the years by graduate students who stay here to teach and work, Chinese adoptions, and native Iowans who travel across the Pacific to live, work and study. Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping’s visit to Iowa this week is the latest in a growing effort to build business and cultural connections.

Keywords: China
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posted onJan26, 2012

After seven months in the Philippines on a Fulbright grant, returning to graduate school at the University of Iowa is my obligation and my privilege. But the cravings that strike me now are the most visceral manifestations of homesickness I’ve ever known. When I think of breakfast, I want only silog, or pan de sal, or taho. When I think of condiments, I want only vinegar or calamansi or banana ketchup. I wake up craving every variation of pork that Filipinos do so deftly and heart-stoppingly: bagnet from Malate. Sisig from Trellis. Lechón from anywhere.

Keywords: Philippines, Fulbright
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posted onJan24, 2012

Last spring, our College of Pharmacy hosted Prof. Nguyen Van Hung (MD, PhD), Associate Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pharmacy and Family Medicine Unit at Haiphong Medical University in Vietnam. It is not unusual, of course, for us to host visiting faculty from abroad: in fact, we have visitors on campus from abroad on a weekly basis, perhaps even on a daily basis, throughout the academic year. What made Hung’s visit special was that he was in residence for the entire spring semester as a Fulbright scholar, working on long-term goals for pharmacy education and practice in Vietnam. Another thing that made it special is that his visit began discussions toward what promises to be a comprehensive, deep partnership between the University of Iowa and his home institution, Haiphong Medical University.

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posted onJan23, 2012

The ethnographic research elucidates ways in which young women’s care labor is appropriated by the state temporary employment as “free labor” in South Korea, building upon John Krinsky’s notion of free labor as state orchestrated exploitation of workers. Through experience of school social workers who are hired and laid off by the state-run Education Welfare Priority Project as a window of thinking about gendered free labor, this talk examines the uniqueness of South Korean education and welfare reforms in the context of constructing two kinds of youth subjects through the Project: first, older youth as care givers through unstable labor as school social workers; and second, younger youth as care receiver and psychological objects in the context of attributing their problems to individual and internal issues. Further, tracing recent unionization efforts among the school social workers, this talk attempts to understand the context of why and how care labor is not readily recognized as a source of exploitation among school social workers. The talk will contribute to advancing analytic tools for understanding the intersection of state employment/exploitation and gendered care labor as an emerging labor neoliberal sector.

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posted onDec21, 2011
Vaclav Havel waves while standing next to Bill Clinton

The University of Iowa International Writing Program (IWP) was viewed with suspicion by Iron Curtain countries during the depths of the Cold War. The Eastern European writers who were allowed to participate could expect to be taken into custody immediately upon their return home, for debriefing to determine if their thinking had been polluted by contact with the decadent West.

Other writers were simply denied permission to depart for Iowa City. Among the writers from the Communist bloc who were prevented from attending, one stood out, although not immediately. The world is now mourning the Dec. 18 passing of Vaclav Havel, the widely honored first president of a democratic Czech Republic whose plans to attend the IWP were derailed 43 years ago.

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posted onDec8, 2011

Chinese students have flocked to American universities in record numbers in recent years, and officials at Iowa’s regent universities say to keep up they have added advisers and counselors, formed committees to monitor the students’ needs and pay special attention to orientation and language programs.

“China has happened to the United States, period,” University of Iowa Director of Admissions Mike Barron said. “They just simply have a lot of well-qualified students that their own universities can’t handle.”

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posted onNov1, 2011

Nobel Prize-winning Nigerian author Wole Soyinka will present a lecture titled “Technology and the Writer: Open Book and Closed Text,” Sunday, Nov. 6, at 3:30 p.m. in Shambaugh Auditorium of the UI Main Library. He will also receive the Rex D. Honey African Studies Lectureship Award, presented by the African Studies Program. This event is free and open to the public.

The African Studies Program, a part of UI International Programs, will present the award in memory of UI faculty member Rex Honey to recognize Soyinka’s outstanding contribution to world literature and his continuing advocacy of human rights reforms in Nigeria and around the globe.

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