Articles tagged with "in the news"

posted onJan22, 2013

The study of genetics has come a long way since Gregor Mendel’s groundbreaking work with pea plants in the mid-19th century. To see just how far we’ve come and where research into genetics is taking us, join WorldCanvass host Joan Kjaer and her panel of expert guests on Friday, February 15, at 5 p.m. in the Old Capitol Senate Chamber, when the topic is "Genetics and New Technologies." The program is free and open to the public.

Comments Comments
posted onJan4, 2013

The Mississippi River, which holds such an important place in North America’s geography, ecology, and culture, is also helping build bridges between the United States and China.

Last summer, the Lucille A. Carver Mississippi Riverside Environmental Research Station (LACMRERS) welcomed some of China’s finest high school students, who came to learn about the Mississippi River. The students spent 18 days visiting three states as part of “Rivers as Bridges,” an international exchange program sponsored by Environment and Public Health Network for Chinese Students and Scholar

Comments Comments
posted onDec19, 2012

Although more than 150 years have passed since the first bullets were fired in the U.S. Civil War, Americans retain a deep interest in the conflict, its causes, the major players, and the impact the war and our complicated history have on our national identity. WorldCanvass guests will continue the conversation on January 25 at 5 p.m., in the Senate Chamber of Old Capitol Museum, when the topic is “The Rupture of Civil War.” The program is free and open to the public.

Comments Comments
posted onDec13, 2012

An ocean stretches between China and the United States. But between Chinese and American University of Iowa students looms just as difficult a barrier to cross — one constructed of language and culture.

The Chinese students make up the largest international student population on campus. UI President Sally Mason traveled to Asia this summer to strengthen the relationship and recruiting efforts between the UI and China. But after the students arrive on campus, making a home in the unfamiliar setting of Iowa City presents a complex set of social challenges.

Comments Comments
posted onDec11, 2012

While locals celebrated Human Rights Day in Iowa City, several took the opportunity to further discuss the future of the University of Iowa Center for Human Rights.

Members from various local advocacy organizations convened Monday to discuss the importance of universally defined human rights, on the 64th anniversary of the U.N. General Assembly’s ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Comments Comments
posted onDec4, 2012

Ronald McMullen, a visiting associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa and a former U.S. ambassador to Eritrea, offers three pieces of advice to students interested in working in international politics.

“Be a good student, a good citizen, and have international experience,” he said. “Grades do matter. And a misdemeanor won’t look good to federal employers.”

Comments Comments
posted onDec4, 2012

What do the University of Iowa’s 1,245 Chinese students, Whirlpool appliances from Middle Amana, Johnson County’s cornfields, Kirkwood’s STEM outreach and West Liberty’s Dual Language Programs have in common?

They represent some of Iowa’s considerable assets in the world-wide competition for growth and prosperity. Thanks to advances in communication and transportation, globalization means that Iowa is more connected to and affected by world events than ever before.

Comments Comments
posted onDec3, 2012

The U.S. government is making it much simpler for colleges and universities to understand why international students attend their institutions. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is simplifying the distribution of degree and English language I-20 forms international students receive from universities following their admission.

With guidance from the program, some universities will face less confusion, but University of Iowa officials see the university as already being conscientious when admitting international students.

Comments Comments
posted onDec3, 2012

The University of Iowa Students for Human Rights will gather on the Pentacrest Wednesday to protest the closing of the UI Center for Human Rights. The demonstration sparked a disagreement between supporters of the center and the Provost’s Office regarding publicity for the event.

Some of the center’s supporters contend UI administrators are suppressing students’ intellectual freedoms by intentionally finding ways to thwart publicity for the protest. However, International Programs Dean Downing Thomas maintained officials are following their usual procedures.

Comments Comments
posted onNov30, 2012

Frances Barnes recalls the profound culture shock she experienced when she first arrived in Iowa three years ago.

“I had never been to the Midwest before and wasn’t prepared for how different everything was,” says the 33-year-old College of Education Rehabilitation and Counselor Education doctoral student from North Carolina. “And I mean everything—the weather, the landscape, the culture, and not seeing as many people who looked like me.”

Comments Comments
posted onNov27, 2012

University of Iowa President Sally Mason, in her recent interview with the DI editors, discussed the future or, more precisely, the elimination of the UI Center for Human Rights as we have known it.

She spoke of the university's budget difficulties and suggested that closing the center would "save some money." She also argued that the provost's plan to parcel out a couple of the center's programs to other academic units was "perfectly appropriate" and would enable the work of the center to continue "in a different capacity."

Comments Comments
posted onNov18, 2012

The number of international students enrolled at the University of Iowa hit an all-time high this fall, and the increase from last year was more than double the national rate. There are 3,571 international students at UI, up 14 percent from the 2011-2012 academic year, in which there were 3,130 international students.

Comments Comments
posted onNov15, 2012

More international students are going to college in the U.S. than ever before, and many of them are traveling from the other side of the globe to come to the corridor.

The University of Iowa offers opportunity for native Iowans, but U of I officials are tapping into a growing Chinese market full of students eager to student in the U.S. Five years ago, the University of Iowa welcomed around 400 new international undergrads; this fall that number jumped to well over 2,000.

Comments Comments
posted onNov15, 2012

The University of Iowa’s international student population accounts for roughly one-third of the state’s monetary contributions by foreign students.

Although the UI’s international program is not the largest in the state, it brought in roughly $101 million to the state’s economy in the 2011-12 academic year.

Comments Comments
posted onNov14, 2012

What rattles a room of University of Iowa business students munching on Korean cuisine?

The pounding bass of “Gangnam Style.”

In an effort to inspire students to become more culturally aware, the UI Tippie College of Business hosted a seminar on Tuesday to the tune of the world-famous “Gangnam Style,” written and performed by Psy.

Comments Comments

Pages

Subscribe to Articles tagged with "in the news"