Articles tagged with "in the news"

posted onJun15, 2012

Nissa Greenquist wanted to be a nurse or pursue some other career where she could give back to the community. But become a teacher? The daughter of two educators, both University of Iowa alumni, says she wanted to avoid going into the profession just because her parents were teachers.

“I wanted to be my own person and not automatically follow in their footsteps,” Nissa says, who recently joined her dad, Steve, on the UI campus to attend the Global Education Summer Institute for Teachers.

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posted onJun13, 2012

European policy leaders have been wrestling for months with how to handle Greece’s unwieldy debt. But that problem isn’t just a problem for those on the other side of the Atlantic to solve.

“That’s not a Greek problem. It’s everybody’s problem. It affects our economy as well,” said Greg Hamot, a professor in the University of Iowa College of Education on Tuesday.

That’s just one example of why Hamot is urging Iowa educators to broaden their curricula to include more content from around the world.

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posted onJun8, 2012

OK, obviously, going to Asia and visiting some of the hot spots such as Hong Kong, Taiwan, Shanghai, and Beijing would be the cat's pajamas. And, obviously, doing it on the UI Foundation's dime would be the bee's knees.

But it won't be all sake and dim sum for President Sally Mason and the UI delegation heading off to those four places in order to recruit students and strengthen ties with Chinese interests.

Presidential fundraising and the UI Foundation have both taken a few shots as of late, but anyone knows that in order to run a business, such as a Board of Regents' university in the state of Iowa, you have to keep the wheels greased and the investors happy — and that takes a little schmoozing.

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posted onJun8, 2012

With more than 1,700 University of Iowa students hailing from China, UI President Sally Mason and a number of university officials will travel to Asia in hopes of establishing new relationships and strengthening existing ties with alumni.

Mason will travel to Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Beijing in China, and Taipei, Taiwan, from July 1-9. A handful of UI officials will accompany Mason on the trip, including Provost P. Barry Butler and UI Foundation President Lynette Marshall.

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posted onJun5, 2012

According to one 2012 expat survey from HSBC, the following 10 countries are the best to live and work in for 2012: Singapore, Hong Kong, United Arab Emirates (UAE), Mexico, Australia, United States, France, China, Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. See the graphic below from Infographic Labs for more detail.

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posted onJun4, 2012

Chaden Djalali will take over as University of Iowa's dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in August — and he already has global plans. One of Djalali's main goals is to promote the college's international reputation.

"I am fully committed to help increase international-exchange opportunities for students and faculty," Djalali told The Daily Iowan in an email. "The ever-increasing connectedness of human beings manifests itself everywhere and has profound political, financial, and environmental implications for all of us."

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posted onJun1, 2012

The University of Iowa has awarded the Mayflower Hall Sushi Workshop with Best Educational Program of the Year Award for 2012. Yume Hikada, International Programs' Japan Outreach Coordinator, held the first workshop in February 2011. Its great turnout and enormous success amongst participants led her to conduct a second workshop in February 2012 that attracted over 100 participants.

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posted onMay10, 2012

Originally from Burlington, Iowa, Brandon Jennings has always had an interest in the Middle East. Very soon, he'll have an address in the Greater Middle East.

Jennings, a senior graduating this May with a major in international studies and minors in religious studies, chemistry, and Arabic, was recently awarded the prestigious Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) through the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. He will be going to Morocco for a 10-week program to study Arabic, which is considered a critical language.

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posted onMay2, 2012

As a costume designer in the theater, I feel that my work often is a re-creation of memories. The actors and I create a life for the costumes and the characters, partly based in fact, and partly in imagination.

Working with other theater artists, we construct a world for the audience that they inhabit with the performers during a performance. That is the magic of theater — a shared existence in real time made up of memories and the suspension of disbelief.

There is great sweetness in remembering a work of art, particularly when it is an experience like a theater performance and you are surrounded by a crowd, a community of focused participants all sharing the same time and place.

That is why it is so vital to have theaters, museums and concert halls, both humble and grand, to experience art in community.

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posted onApr26, 2012

Join us for the final WorldCanvass of the 2011-2012 season when we consider the connections between art and memory. Memories live and resonate in both the conscious and unconscious spaces of our experience, but art allows for expression that moves beyond simple narrative. How does a poet draw upon memory? What does a masterful printmaker, painter, musician or writer take from his/her own personal experience and what is sheer imagination? Why is art such a powerful medium for the preservation and expression of a community’s cultural memory?

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posted onApr10, 2012

In this presentation, I trace the roots of Japanese reggae from the early 1970s until the present, focusing on the musical productive strategies through which “J-reggae” has come into being. Among these strategies are incorporation of Japanese musical traditions; creative use of the Japanese language (as opposed to patois); and in the way of artistic self-representation, male dancehall performers’ referencing of the figure of the samurai. I argue that these strategies invoke discourses of the traditional that are deeply interlinked with those of modernity in Japan, a modernity shaped by the specter of Western domination that Japanese, like Jamaicans, have long had to negotiate. I focus, however, on the link between these discourses of the traditional and a contemporary ethos of cultural internationalism in recessionary Japan, in which Japanese reggae practitioners imagine global southern countries like Jamaica as simultaneously signs of these artists’ cultural and sociopolitical cosmopolitanism, but also as tradition-bound and thus instructive symbols of Japan’s own potential rebirth.

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posted onApr10, 2012

Madhavapeddi Murthy, Dancers and Orchestra will be in residence April 16-20 within the UI Department of Dance and UI School of Music. Murthy and his troupe will culminate their residency Friday, April 20, with an open lecture demonstration followed by a public performance at the Space Place Theater.

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posted onApr6, 2012

The University of Iowa Opera Studies Forum (OSF) in International Programs will conclude its 2011-12 lecture series coordinated with the Metropolitan Opera Live in HD theater screenings Monday, April 9, with a talk on Verdi’s “La Traviata” presented by Roberta M. Marvin. All lectures take place at 5:30 p.m. in the University Capitol Centre conference seminar room 2520D and are free and open to the public.

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posted onApr4, 2012

This new consciousness among vernacular publics highlights corruption at all levels of government and the corporate world, while still resisting the hegemonic discourse of economic growth. The talk looks at the recent populist social mobilization (jan andolans) against corruption and its possible grievance mechanism (Jan Lokpal Movement). It analyzes how an urban democratization movement features a competitive struggle among vernacular publics, and how the state and news media struggle over the legitimacy of alternate politics and vernacular public space, as it moves beyond electoral politics but still calls for democratization and transparency in governance.

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posted onApr4, 2012

We’ve had the melting pot and the tossed salad; now we have the stir-fry. The Stir-Fry Project will happen over the next few weeks at the Senior Center of Iowa City. The project is “a collaborative community art project that explores the stories of people who have resettled to Iowa from different countries through collective works of art.” There are workshops in stop-motion animation, mixed media, and printmaking. Community members may participate. The workshops and materials are free, but pre-registration is required. There will be an opening exhibition of the collaborative work on April 27, and the art will remain on display through May.

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