Articles tagged with "faculty"

posted onApr26, 2012

The European Studies Group will conclude its spring lecture series will a talk presented by Rebecca Léal, titled “My Mother, the Stranger: Ruptures, Transmissions, and Stereotypes in Popular Representations of Arab-French Mothers,” at noon Friday, May 4, in 2520D UCC. A light luncheon will be provided and the event is free and open to the public.

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posted onApr26, 2012

Join us for the final WorldCanvass of the 2011-2012 season when we consider the connections between art and memory. Memories live and resonate in both the conscious and unconscious spaces of our experience, but art allows for expression that moves beyond simple narrative. How does a poet draw upon memory? What does a masterful printmaker, painter, musician or writer take from his/her own personal experience and what is sheer imagination? Why is art such a powerful medium for the preservation and expression of a community’s cultural memory?

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posted onApr19, 2012

During the week of April 23-27 the UI UNA, Global Health Club, the Food and Water Watch, and Delta Sigma Pi will be sponsoring a week of global citizenship. In honor of UI Global Citizen's week, the Global Health Club formally invites all to attend the Charity:Water Benefit.

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posted onApr10, 2012

In this presentation, I trace the roots of Japanese reggae from the early 1970s until the present, focusing on the musical productive strategies through which “J-reggae” has come into being. Among these strategies are incorporation of Japanese musical traditions; creative use of the Japanese language (as opposed to patois); and in the way of artistic self-representation, male dancehall performers’ referencing of the figure of the samurai. I argue that these strategies invoke discourses of the traditional that are deeply interlinked with those of modernity in Japan, a modernity shaped by the specter of Western domination that Japanese, like Jamaicans, have long had to negotiate. I focus, however, on the link between these discourses of the traditional and a contemporary ethos of cultural internationalism in recessionary Japan, in which Japanese reggae practitioners imagine global southern countries like Jamaica as simultaneously signs of these artists’ cultural and sociopolitical cosmopolitanism, but also as tradition-bound and thus instructive symbols of Japan’s own potential rebirth.

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posted onApr6, 2012

Please join the African Studies Program for its spring 2012 Baraza lecture series. This lecture series is sponsored by ASP and International Programs.

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posted onApr6, 2012

Stephen J. Rapp of Iowa, the ambassador-at-large heading the Office of Global Criminal Justice in the U.S. Department of State, will give a lecture titled "Diplomacy for Global Justice: The tools for establishing truth, accountability and reconciliation after the commission of mass atrocities." Rapp will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, in the South Room of the Iowa Memorial Union.

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posted onApr6, 2012

Autobiography is Another Story: “Lives” in Hindi
Abstract: Hindi has a rich tradition of writing about the self – both in formal autobiography (atmakatha, ap-biti) and in more casual contexts and genres. This talk discusses a dozen works, ranging from self-consciously literary texts to the transcribed memoirs of a provincial station-master. Themes such as family life and childhood memories illuminate these narratives, while darker moments include jail writings by the sometime prime minister Chandrashekhar (imprisoned and released by Indira Gandhi during the Emergency of the 1970s) and by Ramprasad Bismil (imprisoned and executed by the British a half-century earlier). My spotlight is on the stylistics of the narratives: how do the various authors crystalize their sweet and bitter experiences into words and bring them to the printed page?

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posted onApr5, 2012

A class offered this spring by the University of Iowa is helping entrepreneurs from around the state learn how to take their businesses global.

The class—Entrepreneurship and Global Trade—is offered online by the Tippie College of Business and John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center. It’s designed to provide practical lessons to small business owners or aspiring small business owners who want to start selling outside the United States.

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posted onApr5, 2012

University of Iowa courses are expanding to meet an increasing level of student interest as the political atmosphere continues to evolve in the Middle East.

Since 2001, UI political-science professors said there has been a marked increase in enthusiasm for courses related to the Middle East. And with the increase, some professors said, comes a responsibility to accurately present the foreign events in an educational way.

Prior to 2001, the UI Political-Science Department had no Middle Eastern coverage separate from a comparative politics courses, said UI political-science Professor Vicki Hesli.

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posted onApr4, 2012

This new consciousness among vernacular publics highlights corruption at all levels of government and the corporate world, while still resisting the hegemonic discourse of economic growth. The talk looks at the recent populist social mobilization (jan andolans) against corruption and its possible grievance mechanism (Jan Lokpal Movement). It analyzes how an urban democratization movement features a competitive struggle among vernacular publics, and how the state and news media struggle over the legitimacy of alternate politics and vernacular public space, as it moves beyond electoral politics but still calls for democratization and transparency in governance.

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posted onMar22, 2012

The 13th annual Crossing Borders Convocation will explore “Transcultural Communication and Migrations in the Indian Ocean Rim and the Caribbean” March 23-24 in W401 Pappajohn Business Building. The event is free and open to the public.

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posted onMar21, 2012

The forum will feature the following speakers and presentations:
George Ayittey: Indigenous and Modern African Institutions: Explaining the Real Causes of Poverty in Africa
Muna B. Ndulo: Is Foreign Aid Working in Africa?
Lyombe Eko: Explaining the Real Causes of Communication Problems in Africa
Denford Madenyika: ICT Infrastructure in Africa: What do We Need in African Schools?
Bell F. Ouelega: Insurance Industry and Africa’s Development
Etse Sikanku: Press Freedom in Africa
Sunday Goshit: African perspectives on environmental issues
Gbenga Ajiboye: The Impact of Corruption on African Youth Development – Case Study- Nigeria
Henri J. Nkuepo: The Real Causes of Food Insecurity in Africa

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posted onMar19, 2012

Over the past couple of years, a number of U.S. universities have set up branch campuses or other extensive satellite ventures (or pulled out of failing ones) particularly in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa: NYU, Michigan State, Texas A&M, and more recently Duke University, just to name a few. Branch campuses can be successful, and meet the needs both of the U.S. institution and of the host country in which the offshore branch is located. Among the reasons U.S.

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posted onMar1, 2012

In today’s world of social media and text messaging, two University of Iowa students have found a way to bring the community together by combining storytelling and art. The collaborative art project Stir Fry is a mix of people of various cultures and ages that are brought together in a series of structured workshops to tell and transform their stories into art.

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posted onFeb29, 2012

Trudy Huskamp Peterson, one of the leading archivists in the world and the 2011 International Impact Award recipient at the University of Iowa, will present two workshops on the UI campus. Both events are free and open to the public.

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