Articles tagged with "faculty"

posted onOct31, 2012

The lecture explores what the new form of warfare with mass armies that were mobilized by a national propaganda and needed the support of the civilian population meant for ordinary citizens. Because of its extraordinary significance, the Battle of Leipzig provides an excellent example for such a study. To understand the extend of the civilian war experiences and the different factors that formed it, the lecture will start in spring 1812, when the war started for the people in Saxony, after four relatively peaceful years, and will end in the summer of 1814, when the wars against Napoleon officially had come to an end, but the population still was confronted with the aftermath of the war. To remember the victims of these wars on the occasion of their 200th anniversary instead of celebrating the glorious military leaders seems to be appropriate for today.

Comments Comments
posted onOct26, 2012

This talk examines the role that historical narrative plays in the public relations agenda of corporate Japan. Most member companies of Japan’s 20th-century keiretsu (corporate conglomerates that included Mitsubishi, Mitsui, and Sumitomo) regularly published official histories as a means of enhancing corporate prestige and to evade critical discussion of their past indiscretions. As a result, company history narratives often obscure more than they illuminate about the corporate subject.

Comments Comments
posted onOct23, 2012

Professor Carl W. Ernst will discuss strategies for making sense of the Qur’an’s complex text during a lecture Thursday, Nov. 1, from 5-7 p.m. in E105 Adler Journalism Building. The talk is titled, “How to Read the Qur’an” and the event is free and open to the public.

For many Americans, the Qur’an is difficult to read, its organization obscure, its messages cryptic or even threatening. This presentation is based on a new book of the same title. Chronological readings of the original sequence of its delivery, exploration of its links to earlier writings, and clarification of the central points of its symmetrical compositions all provide interested readers with new tools for comprehending an undeniably important religious document.

Comments Comments
posted onOct15, 2012

Professor, author, and researcher Ann Grodzins Gold will give a lecture Thursday, Oct. 25, from 4:00-5:30 p.m. in 2390 University Capitol Centre (the Executive Board Room) discussing the cultural impact on an Indian community of losing a river of great spiritual importance. The talk is titled, “From Snakes' Blood to Sewage: Mythology and Ecology of a Minor River in Rajasthan.”

Comments Comments
posted onOct11, 2012

While the security threat North Korea poses is often discussed, little is known about the severe human-rights crisis the country is suffering.

This is something the organization Liberty in North Korea, commonly referred to as LiNK, wants to change. The University of Iowa LiNK rescue team hosted its biggest event of the semester Wednesday night. Representatives from LiNK showed a documentary created by the non-governmental organization entitled “The People’s Crisis.” They also presented their Shift campaign, in which their goal is to change the way the media talk about North Korea, moving away from military issues to more humanitarian concerns.

Keywords: North Korea
Comments Comments
posted onOct11, 2012

University of Iowa junior Jake Thomas wants his study-abroad experience to be different and out of the ordinary. The first place that popped up in his mind was a country several thousand miles away from his home — India.

The business major has a keen interest in understanding how business is conducted in India and bringing home some unique skills. He is eyeing the Social Entrepreneurship course in the UI India Winterim program.

Keywords: India
Comments Comments
posted onOct11, 2012

Vicki Ruiz knows Latino culture.

“Latinos are the biggest minority group in the United States, but their contributions and legacies in the United States often remain invisible to the general public and contribute to the unfortunate notion that Latinos are peoples who arrived the day before yesterday,” said the professor of history and Chicano/Latino Studies. Around 16 percent of the United States is made up of Latinos, and that demographic is only going to grow, according to the 2010 Census. Being the fastest growing minority group in the United States, it is estimated that this 16 percent will jump up to 30 percent by 2050.

Comments Comments
posted onOct10, 2012

The results of the 2010 census show that Latinos now make up the largest ethnic minority group in Iowa.

In recent years, the University of Iowa has responded to that demographic shift by expanding its outreach to prospective students of Latino heritage, hiring faculty members with expertise in Latino issues and supporting research on Latinos.

Comments Comments
posted onOct10, 2012

Co-founder and tireless supporter of the International Writing Program (IWP) at the University of Iowa, Hualing Nieh Engle will receive the 2012 International Impact Award as part of the November 2 WorldCanvass program “IWP: Writing the Stories of the World.” The program, which is free and open to the public, will take place from 5-7 p.m., in the Senate Chamber of the Old Capitol Museum. A reception will follow.

Comments Comments
posted onOct8, 2012

The European Studies Group (ESG) is hosting a luncheon talk featuring speaker Gabriele von Roedern at noon Friday, Oct. 19, in 1117 University Capitol Centre. Her talk, titled “Questionable Pasts: Managing a Nazi-Era Past in the West German Public, 1957-1979,” will focus on the legal attempts by individuals to control how their personal pasts were portrayed in public discourses in West Germany.

Gabriele von Roedern is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Her dissertation examines how individuals accused of having a Nazi-era past sought to manage those accusations within the larger West German public.

Comments Comments
posted onSep24, 2012

How severely is the world’s energy consumption affecting the health of its communities?

There is a growing consensus on the part of the global community that a reevaluation of energy needs and mechanisms to produce energy is imperative. Using the lens of health impacts as the focus, this year’s Global Health Studies conference, “Energy and Global Health on a Sick Planet,” will explore current challenges and potential remedies to global energy needs.

Comments Comments
posted onSep24, 2012

It has been almost two years since President Obama lessened restrictions on travel to Cuba. This move made by our president provides academic, religious, and cultural groups with unparalleled opportunities to travel to this previously forbidden land.

The University of Iowa took advantage of the situation and started the Overseas Writing Workshop in Cuba in January, immediately after President Obama’s lessening of travel restrictions, as reported by The Daily Iowan.

Comments Comments
posted onSep18, 2012

No students have registered for the University of Iowa’s Overseas writing program in Cuba 10 days before the deadline, despite program managers opening its gates to graduate and non-degree seeking students.

Leslie McNelius, a study-abroad adviser and one of the pioneers of the UI’s program in Cuba, said she was not too concerned because she expects a lot of last-minute applications.

“We’ve had quite a few email and phone inquiries from potential participants in the last weeks," she said. "There’s an info session coming up … so some may turn in apps after that."

Comments Comments
posted onSep13, 2012

The long history of Latino presence in the Midwest and the changing demographics of our region will be among the topics discussed on the October 5 WorldCanvass program, The Latino Midwest. The free program will take place in Room 2780, University Capitol Centre from 5-7 p.m. and the public is invited to attend. WorldCanvass is produced by International Programs and hosted by Joan Kjaer.

Keywords: history, English, Spanish
Comments Comments
posted onAug29, 2012

UI President Sally Mason, fresh off a summer visit to China and Taiwan, highlighted the growing reach of UI as what she called a “global institution” Tuesday at a luncheon hosted by the Iowa City Foreign Relations Council.

Mason shared slides from the UI delegation’s trip to Asia, a 10-day visit in July designed to strengthen current relationships with alumni and partners in Hong Kong, Taipei, Beijing and Shanghai, and establish new ties.

Keywords: Asia
Comments Comments

Pages

Subscribe to Articles tagged with "faculty"