Articles tagged with "events"

posted onDec4, 2012

Ronald McMullen, a visiting associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa and a former U.S. ambassador to Eritrea, offers three pieces of advice to students interested in working in international politics.

“Be a good student, a good citizen, and have international experience,” he said. “Grades do matter. And a misdemeanor won’t look good to federal employers.”

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posted onNov19, 2012

The European Studies Group’s fourth-annual conference, “Napoleon and the World: Literature, Politics and the Arts,” will build off of the many UI projects this year on Napoleon Bonaparte for the 1812 bicentennial. The conference will be held Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in 315 Phillips Hall. This event is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

The keynote address “Isaac and Alexandre: Sons and Memorialists of Napoleon’s Black Generals” will be presented by Daniel Desormeaux, associate professor of French in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago.

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posted onNov19, 2012

The story behind Mozart’s La clemenza di tito will be examined for public audiences in the next UI lecture coordinated with the Metropolitan Opera’s Live in HD theatre transmissions. The talk will be presented by Robert Ketterer and held Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 5:30 p.m. in the University Capitol Centre, Room 2520D. This event is free and open to the public.

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posted onNov14, 2012

What rattles a room of University of Iowa business students munching on Korean cuisine?

The pounding bass of “Gangnam Style.”

In an effort to inspire students to become more culturally aware, the UI Tippie College of Business hosted a seminar on Tuesday to the tune of the world-famous “Gangnam Style,” written and performed by Psy.

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posted onNov14, 2012

Sure, it’s got a good beat and you dance to it, but Gangnam Style is more than your usual pop trifle about never getting back together or calling me, maybe.

“There’s something else going on here that explains its popularity,” says Mark Archibald, assistant director for global community engagement in the Tippie College of Business, who discussed the song’s world conquest over lunch with about 50 Tippie students Tuesday. “It’s a reminder of how many times we come across a cross-cultural context in our daily lives that we don’t understand.”

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posted onNov14, 2012

Stephanie Smith won’t be eligible to vote for five years, but a recent experience hosted by the University of Iowa College of Education left her eager to fill out a ballot.

“Instead of letting other people choose the person who is going to be our leader, I can have a say in it,” she says with a smile.

The seventh grader from Cedar Rapids was one of more than 300 middle-school and junior-high students attending the 16thannual International Day for Human Rights Nov. 6. This year’s event focused on the “Human Right to Political Participation.”

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posted onNov14, 2012

This presentation discusses the effects of India's 2005 Patents Act on the control of medical knowledge and products in India. This new law, which conforms to the World Trade Organization's intellectual property conventions and discontinues India's prohibition of product patents for medicines, is having complex and unintended effects on the production of biomedical pharmaceuticals by Indian drug manufacturers and the products and practices of Ayurveda, India’s indigenous medical system.

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posted onNov13, 2012

What is globalization and how does it affect the world economy? What implications does globalization have for the United States, for Iowa, and for individuals? WorldCanvass guests will explore these and other questions when they gather in the Senate Chamber of the Old Capitol Museum on Friday, December 7, at 5 p.m. The program, which is produced by International Programs and hosted by Joan Kjaer, is free and open to the public.

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posted onNov5, 2012

The University of Iowa will celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide by recognizing International Education Week 2012 through several events and activities on the UI campus. A joint initiative of the U.S. Departments of State and Education, International Education Week was first held in 2000 and today is celebrated in more than 100 countries worldwide.

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posted onNov1, 2012

How do you recover from a natural disaster like Hurricane Sandy, which is estimated to have caused billions of dollars in economic losses, as well as emotional damages from the rising death toll? An upcoming UI workshop will examine several recent worldwide disasters in an attempt to answer that question.

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posted onNov1, 2012

This WorldCanvass Studio features participants in a collaborative writing project called "Face to Face," a project aimed at engaging Iowa's underserved youth with the liberating and expressive powers of creative writing.

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posted onOct31, 2012

Toward the end of “One Tree Three Lives” — a documentary on the life and work of Hualing Engle, the Chinese novelist and co-founder of the International Writing Program — there is a shot of her dining room table where, she reports, more than 600 writers have come to eat during her time in Iowa City.

It is a telling moment: hospitality is a recurring theme of Angie Chen’s film, which had its U.S. premiere on Sunday at the Landlocked Film Festival. And Engle’s spirit of generosity is what will be celebrated at 5 p.m. Friday in the Old Capitol Senate Chamber, when the UI’s International Programs awards her its International Impact Award for her contributions to global understanding.

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posted onOct31, 2012

The lecture explores what the new form of warfare with mass armies that were mobilized by a national propaganda and needed the support of the civilian population meant for ordinary citizens. Because of its extraordinary significance, the Battle of Leipzig provides an excellent example for such a study. To understand the extend of the civilian war experiences and the different factors that formed it, the lecture will start in spring 1812, when the war started for the people in Saxony, after four relatively peaceful years, and will end in the summer of 1814, when the wars against Napoleon officially had come to an end, but the population still was confronted with the aftermath of the war. To remember the victims of these wars on the occasion of their 200th anniversary instead of celebrating the glorious military leaders seems to be appropriate for today.

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posted onOct30, 2012

Join the Confucius Institute for the final talk in its “Culture for Lunch” mini lecture series on Tuesday, Nov. 6, from 12:15-1:15 in 1117 University Capitol Centre. The topic, “Ancient Chinese Thought’s Effect on Traditional Architectural Culture,” will be presented by Yong Zhu, an associate professor at Beijing Foreign Studies University, China.

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posted onOct26, 2012

This talk examines the role that historical narrative plays in the public relations agenda of corporate Japan. Most member companies of Japan’s 20th-century keiretsu (corporate conglomerates that included Mitsubishi, Mitsui, and Sumitomo) regularly published official histories as a means of enhancing corporate prestige and to evade critical discussion of their past indiscretions. As a result, company history narratives often obscure more than they illuminate about the corporate subject.

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