Articles tagged with "China"

posted onFeb17, 2014

The cultural segregation between Chinese and domestic students is one of the emerging issues and tensions that both international students and their domestic counterparts are facing on an increasingly diverse UI campus. In hopes of addressing those issues and identifying others, the UI Center for Asian and Pacific Studies next week will lead a first-ever U.S.-China student workshop on the undergraduate experience at Iowa.

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posted onFeb14, 2014

Filmmaker Steve Maing is coming to UI February 20–21 to screen his award-winning documentary High Tech, Low Life about two of China’s first and most daring citizen reporters who challenge the status quo by reporting on censored news stories.

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posted onFeb13, 2014

The Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, allows both the country I’m from (China) and the country I currently live in (United States) to compete against each other in many different sports. But outside of this event, I have learned from personal experience the differences between Chinese and American sports.

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posted onFeb12, 2014

Suyun Ma, who was recently hired as UI International Programs’ first external global relations coordinator, uses Chinese social media platforms to communicate and cultivate stronger relationships with prospective Chinese students and their parents as well as UI’s growing alumni base in Asia.

Keywords: social media, China
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posted onFeb7, 2014

UI alumna Jacqueline Klein, who received her Ph.D. from the College of Education in 2007, left a job as director of academic advising and learning development at NYU’s College of Nursing in New York to be part of the new endeavor. She is now assistant dean of academic and global affairs at NYU Shanghai.

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posted onFeb6, 2014

UI senior Yikun Chen hails from Beijing. While snow isn’t a new experience for the accounting major, Iowa weather’s deadly combination of snow and bitter cold has been less than inviting. “It just feels like a thousand needles punching me in the face,” Chen said. “I enjoy the snow, but I don’t enjoy the cold.

Keywords: weather, India, China
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posted onFeb6, 2014

Before I came to the United States, I hadn't experienced the freezing cold temperatures as I recently have at Iowa. When I go outside, I have to wear three tops, three trousers, and even very thick socks to make sure I stay warm. During my three and a half years here, I've gradually become comfortable with the severe weather conditions. But in China, the weather is completely different, so it's taken a lot to get used to Iowa.

Keywords: China, Siqi Wang, weather
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posted onFeb4, 2014

Across the United States, the growing presence of students and scholars from East, Southeast, and South Asia has become an important feature of the academic landscape. A logical outcome of our shrinking world, heralded as promoting values of diversity, tolerance, and global understanding, this trend that greatly enriches our intellectual and social environment also has created new challenges. An upcoming workshop at the UI will bring together 50 Chinese and U.S. undergraduate students to address key issues arising in this changing educational environment and produce recommendations for the campus community.

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posted onJan31, 2014

The basis of a future anti-cancer drug could be found in a sponge from more than 1,600 feet under the sea and the bulb of an African flower. Zhendong Jin, a University of Iowa associate professor of medicinal and natural products chemistry, replicates the anti-cancer compounds found in Côte d’Ivoire and a sea sponge to, hopefully, find the most affective cancer drug available.

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posted onJan30, 2014

The Chinese New Year is the most important Chinese holiday. The exact date depends on the traditional Chinese calendar — the Lunar Calendar, Nong Li — which was set by the 24 Solar Terms. These Terms help farmers know when it is best to plant their corps. The Chinese New Year is also called Spring Festival or Lunar New Year.

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posted onJan23, 2014

This winter break, I was able to change some of my original opinions about the United States through a month of traveling. I had the chance to visit many places on the East Coast and spend time with my friends. First, Christmas was not what I imagined. I found there was almost no one on the streets, and it was even difficult to find an open restaurant, bar, or anywhere to stay during the night.

Keywords: Christmas, Siqi Wang, China
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posted onDec19, 2013

This winter break will be different for me — it will be the first time I’ll spend it in the United States. Because of this, I suddenly realized it would also be my first American Christmas, and I have no idea what to expect. In China, we also celebrate Christmas but not like how most Americans celebrate.

Keywords: Siqi Wang, Christmas, China
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posted onDec12, 2013

Social networks play a large role in the life of a college student. For me specifically, I have found my kindergarten friends through Chinese social networks, researched information on universities through Twitter, and even found an apartment through Facebook. On American social networks, people can say what they want and share opinions on various topics without being constrained. But in China, not all words can be said because the government controls our freedom of speech.

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posted onDec11, 2013

Bridges International will host a Christmas party for all UI students on Friday at the Asian Pacific American Cultural Center to introduce American traditions to all who attend. The group is part of Iowa City for Campus Crusade for Christ’s international ministry.

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posted onDec11, 2013

In 1885, Jin Yunmei, a young woman from China, received her medical degree from the Women’s Medical College of the New York Infirmary, becoming the first female Chinese on record to have a U.S. education. It was a time when few Chinese men had the opportunity to study abroad, while the overwhelming majority of women remained uneducated. China is now the world’s second largest economy. Its students now count for the largest population of international students in America. Plus, there are far more Chinese females on U.S. campuses.

Keywords: China
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